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Welcome to the 2015 DLF Forum! Community Notes folder: http://bit.ly/1kHKur8

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Sunday, October 25
 

7:00am

Registration & Info Desk
Sunday October 25, 2015 7:00am - 5:00pm
Foyer (Lower Level) Pinnacle Hotel

8:00am

CLIR Postdoctoral Fellows Meeting
You need this or a related ticket from Eventbrite to add the meeting to your Sched: CLIRDLF Postdoctoral Fellow. (But don't worry! We already have the list of attendees.) 
This is a closed meeting for participants in the CLIR Postdoctoral Fellows Program. 

Sunday October 25, 2015 8:00am - 5:00pm
Port of Singapore Pinnacle Hotel

9:00am

DLF Liberal Arts Colleges Preconference: Introduction & Keynote
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The keynote will be jointly presented by Cecily Walker, Assistant Manager for Community Digital Initiatives & eLearning at Vancouver Public Library, and Chris Bourg, Ph.D., Director of Libraries at MIT.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Bourg

Chris Bourg

Director of Libraries, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Chris Bourg is the Director of Libraries at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where she also has oversight of the MIT Press. Prior to assuming her role at MIT, Chris worked for 12 years in the Stanford University Libraries, most recently as the Associate University Librarian for Public Services. | | Chris is keenly interested in issues of diversity and inclusion in higher education, and in the role libraries play in advancing social... Read More →
avatar for Cecily Walker

Cecily Walker

Systems Project Manager, Vancouver Public Library


Sunday October 25, 2015 9:00am - 10:00am
Salon A Pinnacle Hotel

10:00am

Break
You need this ticket from Eventbrite to sign up: DLF Liberal Arts Colleges Preconference.
Sunday October 25, 2015 10:00am - 10:15am
Foyer (Lower Level) Pinnacle Hotel

10:15am

Advancing Digital Humanities and Digital Scholarship at Liberal Arts Colleges: A Consortium Approach to Balancing Innovation and Preservation.
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Advancing Digital Humanities and Digital Scholarship at Liberal Arts Colleges: A Consortium Approach to Balancing Innovation and Preservation.

Our institutions are grappling with the myriad of possibilities presented by knowledge access, use, and development in the digital realm. Digital scholarship involves approach (research methods), dissemination (contextualization, publication), and management (discovery, persistence, preservation). Supporting all of these facets can be challenging for a small Liberal Arts College, but doing so provides rich opportunities for significant undergraduate involvement within the research process, which has long been a hallmark of liberal education. These efforts require powerful and flexible tools to connect and manipulate information. How do we meet digital research and teaching needs, continue our missions to support access and preservation, and also promote the research and development efforts required to explore new possibilities? Five small liberal arts colleges (Grinnell, Hamilton, Lafayette, Vassar, & Williams) began considering these questions as a consortium in 2013. With an eye toward other successful consortial models (ex. CLAMP), we are collaborating to develop a model for the creation and management of sustainable digital collections and scholarly publications, as well as the development of generative digital research applications, built within the open source architecture of Islandora and Fedora Commons. We will discuss the similarities and differences in our institutional goals and resources, why one institution is exploring Hydra, efficiencies gained through this partnership, our work towards deep technical collaboration, what we expect to achieve through the use of outside consultants, and how we hope this model will enable broader participation from our sector. As an extension of our digital initiatives and IT/Library collaborative efforts we are committed to exploring new workflows and open source technologies across institutions. Further, we are continuing to develop innovative ways to make them work within sustainable library preservation models. Our approach builds upon our shared liberal arts perspectives and the combined expertise of Library and IT professionals to support faculty and student scholarship and learning.

Speakers
SF

Shay Foley

Asst Dir of the Library for Tech and Digital Initi, Vassar College
JL

jonathan leamon

Director of Instructional Technology, Williams College
avatar for Eric Luhrs

Eric Luhrs

Director of Digital Scholarship Services, Lafayette College
Eric Luhrs is the Director of Digital Scholarship Services at Skillman Library, Lafayette College, where he leads a team of specialist librarians, a CLIR post-doc, and a VR curator responsible for designing and building digital research projects with faculty partners, developing and supporting the library's digital repository infrastructure, and managing production image and metadata creation for related projects, including Lafayette’s Visual... Read More →
avatar for Janet Simons

Janet Simons

Co-Director Digital Humanities Initiative, Hamilton College
Hamilton College


Sunday October 25, 2015 10:15am - 11:15am
Salon E Pinnacle Hotel

10:15am

The Professional is Personal: Reflections on Personal Digital Archiving Day in Four Liberal Arts Colleges
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The Professional is Personal: Reflections on Personal Digital Archiving Day in Four Liberal Arts Colleges

When is the personal the professional? For faculty and students, spending countless hours researching, writing, and developing new ideas, the answer (only sometimes tongue-in-cheek) is “always:” digital archiving of their personal materials quickly turns into the creation of collections that can span multiple years, formats, subjects, and versions. Colleges and universities serve a unique set of users who produce a variety of digital materials for both their personal and professional life, which often overlap and provide different challenges. A student may want to save coursework, personal social media, and student club materials for long-term preservation. A faculty member may want to save research data, drafts of papers, and email correspondence. Staff may have similar issues with being able to organize various digital data across a department. This can become overwhelming and lead to mismanagement and loss of important data. 

In the library, we know well that “save” and “curate” are very different. What role can liberal arts college libraries play in helping our faculty and students curate and sustain their digital research materials and scholarly communication objects, and provide education and outreach to address all of these complexities? We have found that personal digital archiving events serve as an excellent conversation starter for each of these groups, uncovering a variety of different projects that can benefit from a stronger library partnership, while providing an opportunity to raise awareness about the challenges involved in sustaining digital materials long-term. Amherst, Bryn Mawr, Vassar, and Wheaton Colleges each held Personal Digital Archiving Days for students, faculty, and staff. This panel will introduce what each institution does for their Personal Digital Archiving Day and then follow with a moderated discussion about goals, outcomes, and further plans for comparison and feedback.

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Appel

Rachel Appel

Digital Projects and Services Librarian, Temple University
avatar for Amy Bocko

Amy Bocko

Digital Initiatives Librarian, Emerson College
Emerson College
avatar for Joanna DiPasquale

Joanna DiPasquale

Head of Digital Scholarship & Technology Services, Vassar College Libraries
avatar for Sarah Walden

Sarah Walden

Digital Project Librarian, Amherst College


Sunday October 25, 2015 10:15am - 11:15am
Salon F Pinnacle Hotel

10:15am

What if Nobody Shows up to Your DH Course? • Building a DH Community of Practice in the Liberal Arts College Library
You need this ticket from Eventbrite to sign up: DLF Liberal Arts Colleges Preconference.
What if Nobody Shows up to Your DH Course?

This case study explores the challenges in developing a digital humanities curriculum at a small liberal arts university. In 2015 we launched DH Studio, a series of one-credit courses taught by library faculty on specific topics within digital scholarship, such as scholarly text encoding or digital history. This year librarians also were asked to teach a 4-credit DH 101 course. With strong university leadership and faculty support behind the emerging DH program, what could go wrong? 

As a lab course for the humanities, each DH Studio is paired as a co-requisite with a humanities course. Functioning as a lab component, DH Studio addresses the need for in-depth learning of digital topics without sacrificing class time from the humanities courses. The aim is to provide students with the conceptual foundation and practical experience to understand why they’re using certain digital methods and tools in their assignments and research projects. 

Our pedagogical innovation is failing in one key area: enrollment. Even with a highly collaborative faculty and the dean of the college as a champion for DH, logistical concerns like registration and degree requirements curtail enrollment in the new courses. 

The lessons we learned while developing and teaching DH Studio and a more extensive DH 101 course have refocused our attention on student engagement. This presentation will cover motivations and practical considerations for developing curriculum based on digital scholarship in a liberal arts environment.

Presenters: Mackenzie Brooks, Jeff Barry

Building a DH Community of Practice in the Liberal Arts College Library

At the Claremont Colleges, a consortium of five undergraduate liberal arts colleges and two graduate universities, the library is not just a container for Digital Humanities events. Claremont librarians have made it a vital center to foster digital scholarship among librarians, faculty, and students interested in integrating digital technology in their instruction and research. Through planning and facilitating symposia, workshops, a summer institute, and an introductory short course for faculty, librarians have become an integral part of the DH community and digital skilling process at the Claremont Colleges. 

To meet the needs of interested but inexperienced faculty members, the library offered a six-week course to introduce Digital Humanities methodologies. Each week we examined a different trend or methodology, including data visualization, spatial and temporal pattern finding, network analysis, and topic modeling. Through our conversations, we interrogated the underlying epistemologies of the theories and technologies under investigation, as well as how those tools and approaches might support our own scholarship and pedagogy. Librarians were also actively involved in planning the Claremont Colleges’ inaugural DH Spring Symposium and Summer Institute this year. Sharing their expertise with the interested and growing DH community at the colleges, they offered workshops on digitization best practices, copyright and fair use, sharing scholarship online, digital pedagogy and instructional design, responsible digital citizenship, and developing one’s digital identity. 

In this way, Claremont Colleges librarians are offering services, in alignment with the library’s traditional mission. Just as importantly, they are positioning themselves as experts in their own right, as well as potential digital scholarship collaborators on faculty projects. What is more, over the next two years, the library will launch several of its own digital scholarly projects based on special collections materials to participate in knowledge production and to train undergraduate and graduate students in digital humanities research and publication.

Presenter: Ashley Sanders, Ph.D


Speakers
avatar for Jeff Barry

Jeff Barry

Associate University Librarian, Washington and Lee University
MB

Mackenzie Brooks

Digital Humanities Librarian, Washington and Lee University
AS

Ashley Sanders

Digital Scholarship Coordinator, Claremont Colleges Library


Sunday October 25, 2015 10:15am - 11:15am
Salon A Pinnacle Hotel

11:20am

Beyond Grunt Work: Putting Students at the Center of Digital Scholarship
You need this ticket from Eventbrite to sign up: DLF Liberal Arts Colleges Preconference.
Beyond Grunt Work: Putting Students at the Center of Digital Scholarship

Amherst, Haverford, and Middlebury Colleges are all small, undergraduate-focused institutions wrestling with what Digital Scholarship and Digital Humanities means for us and our communities. One method we have used to focus our explorations is to create and support undergraduate employment and internships in Digital Scholarship. 

At Middlebury College, the Digital Liberal Arts Initiative (DLA) is a Mellon-funded, campus-wide opportunity for faculty to explore digital scholarship methods. Special Collections, an area of digital expertise within the DLA, received funding for a Digital Film Preservation Student Assistant. This position, occupied by the one of the founding members of the Student Darkroom Club, plays a key role in the digitization, indexing, cataloging, research, and outreach efforts associated with an ongoing project to digitize the Middlebury College’s archival films. 

During the academic year, Haverford College Libraries co-sponsor the Digital Scholarship Fellows program. Fellows engage in a series of workshops where they develop skills in the use of technology to ask scholarly questions and collaboratively plan, develop, and build a digital scholarship project over the course of the year. In the summer months, Haverford Libraries offers several internships to create digital scholarship projects involving both library collections materials and faculty research. 

The Amherst College Library’s Digital Programs Department sponsors and coordinates a Digital Scholarship Internship program for a cohort of three to four students over the length of the summer. The program introduces students to a range of methodologies and techniques, as well as research, archival and digital collections, team-based learning, and project management skills. By the end of the summer, they develop and build a digital scholarship project based around an archival collection. 

Our panelists will discuss the structures of their programs, similarities and differences between them, and offer advice for other institutions which may wish to begin similar initiatives.


Speakers
avatar for Rebekah Irwin

Rebekah Irwin

Curator and Director, Special Collections & Archives, Middlebury College
I'm the director of Special Collections and Archives at Middlebury College in Vermont. In this role, I oversee the rare books collection, the college archives, and the conservation, preservation, and digitization of Middlebury’s library collections (including born-digital archives). Prior to coming to Middlebury, I was the head of the digital projects and metadata unit at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale University.
avatar for Sarah Walden

Sarah Walden

Digital Project Librarian, Amherst College
MZ

Mike Zarafonetis

Digital Scholarship Librarian, Haverford College


Sunday October 25, 2015 11:20am - 12:20pm
Salon A Pinnacle Hotel

11:20am

Supporting DH/DS at Liberal Arts Colleges: Organizing for Sustainability • The Institution and Communal Project Development • No Limits?
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Supporting DH/DS at Liberal Arts Colleges: Organizing for Sustainability

As digital humanities (DH) and digital scholarship (DS) proliferate at liberal arts colleges (LACs), librarians have become engaged with DH/DS projects on their campuses. As such, now is a good time to reflect on our varied roles and ask questions about the efficacy of our organizations for DH/DS. This presentation will explore the tensions between the organizational structures of LAC libraries and the myriad ways that DH/DS is currently supported at LACs. Drawing from a survey and analysis of models among LAC libraries, the presenters will explore the considerations that can inform a successful DH/DS framework. 

While the mission and values of LACs present unique opportunities to engage with innovative scholarship and pedagogy, our infrastructures present some specific challenges to supporting and providing leadership for team-based, labor-intensive projects. Among other issues, we will consider how perennial challenges facing LAC libraries -- the evolution of the librarian’s role from narrowly defined to expansive and fluid, technological and infrastructural limitations, the roles of undergraduate students in supporting faculty research and teaching -- translate into the realm of DH/DS support. 

Further, the traditional organizational models of libraries generally create barriers for fostering a robust DH/DS program. While the prospect for changing organizational structures may seem remote, we argue that librarians have the experience and perspective to optimize support for DH/DS, especially given the relationship-driven nature of LAC culture. Finally, we raise questions about how collaborations based on factors besides geography may be particularly fruitful for addressing skill and infrastructure gaps on LAC campuses.

Presenters: Jason Paul, Heather Tompkins

The Institution and Communal Project Development

Liberal arts colleges that are engaged in digital scholarship, be it aspirationally or actually, have an opportunity to reframe what we have come to recognize as "collaborative" digital scholarship. Because their campuses and populations (spatially speaking) are generally more condensed, the opportunities are greater (probabilistically speaking) for serendipitous interdisciplinary and interdepartmental exchange of ideas. As many practitioners and pedagogues will attest, however, the answers to our questions both technological and theoretical are rarely found in this way. I want to suggest that we might usefully reconsider "collaborative" work on digital projects as, instead, "communal" work.

Presenter: Jacob Heil

No Limits?

What are the limits of digital scholarship centers in the liberal arts college environment? From the past few years of conversation we know that our organizations are consulting on the use of digital scholarly tools, developing new learning spaces, advancing forms of scholarly communication, creating and managing digital resources, and defining information and media literacies. In this session I will ask whether it is strategically wise to tackle all of these challenges simultaneously, if there is a “natural order” for development, and if there are limits to the role that centers may play in a liberal arts context.

Presenter: Daniel Chamberlain


Speakers
avatar for Jacob Heil

Jacob Heil

Digital Scholarship Librarian, Dir. of CoRE, College of Wooster
College of Wooster
avatar for Heather Tompkins

Heather Tompkins

Head, Collection Services, St. Catherine University


Sunday October 25, 2015 11:20am - 12:20pm
Salon E Pinnacle Hotel

11:20am

Ways and Means toward a Digital Projects Committee • Sometimes You’re the Boat, Sometimes You’re the Wave: Responding to and Initiating Change in Digital Collections Stewardship
You need this ticket from Eventbrite to sign up: DLF Liberal Arts Colleges Preconference.
Ways and Means toward a Digital Projects Committee

Entering the digital realm can be a challenge for any institution; technology is constantly advancing, digital preservation strategies are not always clear, and resources are limited. This can be especially true for liberal arts colleges where library staffing is often smaller and as a result staff are constantly balancing competing priorities while wearing multiple hats.
At the University of Puget Sound we have developed a decentralized committee to oversee digital projects with the goal of making our unique material available electronically. Three staff members from the library with the appropriate skill sets were tasked with forming the committee in 2013 and since that time have researched and implemented policies on collecting born digital content, digitizing existing material, and assigning metadata to digital objects. The committee is made up of the Archivist and Special Collections Librarian who oversees digitization and content from the Archives & Special Collections and coordinates the work of our committee, the Metadata Librarian who advises on metadata, and the Business Liaison Librarian who coordinates outreach efforts around the institutional repository.

We will discuss the formation and work of our committee, including the development of workflows, guidelines and policies; how this decentralized model works and how it might be adapted by other institutions; and ways that we are working to further decentralize this model by empowering our librarian colleagues to begin discussions and promote use of the digital collections, lead future projects, and create metadata for collections affiliated with the departments in their subject areas.

Presenters: Katie Henningsen, Hilary Robbeloth

Sometimes You’re the Boat, Sometimes You’re the Wave: Responding to and Initiating Change in Digital Collections Stewardship

Rachel Vagts, Head of Special Collections & Archives, and Daniel Weddington, Technology Coordinator for Special Collections & Archives, are both recent hires at Berea College, a small liberal arts work college in central Kentucky. They will use their experience navigating a dramatic digital collections refocus at Berea College as a case study for how to leverage the opportunities and challenges presented by organizational transition to better position a Special Collections & Archives at a small liberal arts school to serve its responsibilities for digital stewardship. 

After a near decade-long grant-funded digitization effort, Berea College Special Collections & Archives had over 100TB worth of audio/visual material housed on 50 external hard drives with no plan in place for long-term storage, preservation, or access. Additionally, if found itself under new leadership, with multiple new staff hires, and a renewed grant-funder directive to increase digital access. Special Collections & Archives had become not only an organization with major digital collection responsibilities, but one in the midst of significant organizational transition. 

Rachel and Daniel’s talk will highlight how they were able to use organizational transition as an opportunity to attempt new, innovative, and necessary approaches to meet the challenges of managing a large digital collection at a small liberal arts institution. They will illustrate how effectively reacting to and initiating change led to new approaches in work processes and arrangements; increased communication and collaboration; and, ultimately, more strategic, efficient management of digital collections. Finally, they will discuss, more broadly, the challenges of managing high expectations for digital content within an organization in flux.

Presenters: Rachel Vagts, Daniel Weddington

Speakers
KH

Katie Henningsen

Special Collections Librarian, University of Puget Sound
avatar for Rachel Vagts

Rachel Vagts

Head of Special Collections & Archives, Berea College
Rachel Vagts is the Head of Special Collections and Archives at Berea College in Berea, Kentucky. After graduating from Gustavus Adolphus College with degrees in History and Political Science, Rachel attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she received a master degree in Library and Information Studies with a concentration in Archival Administration. While working on her degree, she held a number of positions at the Wisconsin... Read More →
avatar for Daniel Weddington

Daniel Weddington

Technology Coordinator for Special Collections & Archives, Berea College


Sunday October 25, 2015 11:20am - 12:20pm
Salon F Pinnacle Hotel

12:20pm

Lunch
Sunday October 25, 2015 12:20pm - 1:35pm
Foyer (Lower Level) Pinnacle Hotel

1:40pm

Creating a Culture of Experimentation: The Studio@Butler
You need this ticket from Eventbrite to sign up: DLF Liberal Arts Colleges Preconference.
Creating a Culture of Experimentation: The Studio@Butler

The Studio@Butler is a space where students, faculty, librarians, and technologists come together in structured and unstructured ways to nurture a culture of exploration and interdisciplinary collaboration to solve research problems in the humanities and social sciences, share technological expertise, and generate new services and technology for the larger Columbia University community. Models for how this space is organized are the artist’s studio, the science lab, and the startup loft. These types of spaces are characterized by open, grass-roots architecture, a variety of working surfaces, the presence of projectors and whiteboards—all requirements that are inexpensive to maintain in the long term. 

The activities of the Studio@Butler complement the broad support services provided by the Digital Humanities Center (DHC). The DHC in the Columbia University Libraries is a space where software and peripherals are made accessible to the research community, and where faculty and students can come to receive consultation and guidance at the intersection of subject expertise and the use of technology in the humanities, The Studio@Butler builds on that foundation as a BYOT (Bring Your Own Technology) space for more advanced users to explore emergent technologies and emergent forms of collaboration. Where the DHC is a place of focused work—somewhere in between the quiet reading cubicle and small group-study sessions—the Studio@Butler is a place of disruption and creative ex-centricity, often involving heated debates around a whiteboard, and a place with the freedom of movement and voice needed for collaborative creation. 

The space has been open for two years and this presentation will focus on the projects and collaborations that have been made possible as a result of this low-tech, flexible, library-based space.


Speakers
BR

Barbara Rockenbach

Director, Humanities & History Libraries, Columbia University


Sunday October 25, 2015 1:40pm - 2:10pm
Salon A Pinnacle Hotel

1:40pm

NW5C Research Data Management & Curation Workshop: A Collaborative Model for Liberal Arts Colleges
You need this ticket from Eventbrite to sign up: DLF Liberal Arts Colleges Preconference.
NW5C Research Data Management & Curation Workshop: A Collaborative Model for Liberal Arts Colleges

In this presentation, we discuss a team-based workshop on data management and curation organized by librarians from the five liberal arts colleges in the Northwest Five Consortium: Willamette University, Whitman College, University of Puget Sound, Reed College, and Lewis & Clark College. The consortium supports collaborative sharing of experience and expertise in support of the core value of integrating teaching and scholarship. Liberal arts data management support faces many of the same challenges, such as issues of scalability and outreach, that other innovative projects face in such environments. We envisioned this workshop as a place to take advantage of the close-knit community structures of liberal arts colleges and bring many of the stakeholders in research data management together to collaborate at a broader consortial level. The model for the workshop was a team from each institution connected to a specific research project: a faculty researcher, one or two student researchers, a librarian, and, optionally, a representative from IT or other technical support. Pre-workshop preparation in the form of a Data Curation Profile interview was used to elucidate the data issues of their team and to help shape the workshop structure. The workshop presented the big-picture challenges and best practices of research data management, and then allowed teams to work on applying these ideas to their own projects. Central to our conception of this workshop was the involvement of undergraduate student researchers in the discussion and implementation of research data management within their groups’ research projects. By involving undergraduate students as well as researchers, IT/tech support, and librarians in a collaborative, cross-campus discussion of research data management best practices and their applications for current research projects, we hope to improve the research data management infrastructure and implementation on our campuses and to consider new avenues for collaboration.


Speakers
PA

Parvaneh Abbaspour

Science & Data Services Librarian, Lewis & Clark College
AB

Amy Blau

Instructional and Data Services Librarian, Whitman College
Research data management, digital humanities, Yiddish
avatar for Ryan Clement

Ryan Clement

Data Services Librarian, Middlebury College
Middlebury College


Sunday October 25, 2015 1:40pm - 2:10pm
Salon F Pinnacle Hotel

1:40pm

Playing to Our Strengths: Collaboration and Maximizing Resources to Build the RDC Platform.
You need this ticket from Eventbrite to sign up: DLF Liberal Arts Colleges Preconference.
Playing to our strengths: Collaboration and maximizing resources to build the RDC platform.

For years, Reed College has been struggling with a digital asset management system that didn’t quite meet the unique needs of our campus. Faculty often request extensive interface customizations for their digital collections, the proprietary software (CONTENTdm) no longer fits our environment, and technology infrastructure issues have created a pyramid of unsustainable workarounds. In 2013, Reed College began to explore alternatives. After surveying the landscape by talking to other liberal arts colleges, national vendors, and local academic institutions, no existing platform seemed to be the right fit. We decided to tap into the expertise on our campus and build a flexible, scalable platform that is customized to our campus environment. Reed Digital Collections (RDC) is a collaborative effort between the Library, Technology Infrastructure Services, and Web Support Services. 

Specifically, this panel will discuss:

  • Why Liberal Arts Colleges are in a unique position to tap local expertise to creatively solve problems.
  • Criteria for the new system, options considered, and reasons why we chose to build a homegrown system.
  • Challenges and benefits of the system design and implementation process.
  • Negotiating time for personnel, establishing effective communication, and sustaining a flexible environment in order to maximize limited resources to best serve the local community.
  • Technical aspects of design: architectural decisions, major components, and system data model.



Speakers
avatar for Angie Beiriger

Angie Beiriger

Digital Assets Librarian, Reed College
Reed College
avatar for Laura Buchholz

Laura Buchholz

Digital Projects Librarian, Reed College
Reed College, United States of America
JM

Jason Meinzer

Senior System Programmer, Reed College


Sunday October 25, 2015 1:40pm - 2:10pm
Salon E Pinnacle Hotel

2:15pm

Collaborating Liberally, Creating Critically: Experimenting With Undergraduate Digital Project Assignments • Beyond A Cabinet of Digital Curiosities: Collection as Praxis
You need this ticket from Eventbrite to sign up: DLF Liberal Arts Colleges Preconference.
Collaborating Liberally, Creating Critically: Experimenting With Undergraduate Digital Project Assignments

Liberal arts college librarians are increasingly collaborating with faculty on course design to incorporate creative digital media projects into their syllabi, supplementing or replacing traditional writing assignments. This presentation describes a collaboration between Smith librarians and a Department of Art faculty member to develop a unique digital assignment for students, creating digital tours of a pre-Columbian site in Latin America. 

We believe innovative partnerships like this fit squarely into liberal arts traditions of interdisciplinarity and criticality. Librarians and faculty collaborated to design an assignment and instruction session on the affordances, ideology, and limitations of four digital platforms -- Twine, Wordpress, Omeka, and iMovie -- and help students decide which one would be most suitable for advancing their “digital argument,” creating a praxis of course concepts, thesis, information architecture, and user experience for the digital project. Student projects were extremely diverse, from building a critical Twine mobile tour of Chichen Itza for Chinese tourists to 3D scanning artifacts from the Smith College Museum of Art for inclusion in a virtual gallery. 

Undergraduate digital scholarship work forces us to work across traditional departmental lines, develop experimental collaborations with a wide range of campus units, and engage students as partners in research and creation. The emerging academic discourse around Critical Making encourages us to consider the designed nature of digital systems and interfaces, then analyze and deconstruct them through hacking, playing, and creating new interfaces of our own. 

Using examples from student work, we will show how students learned to deeply read and critique digital work, work across traditional disciplinary boundaries, and then make arguments through digital design and interface, along with text and images. Finally, we will discuss Smith’s Design Thinking and the Liberal Arts Framework and future directions for collaborations with faculty members at Smith.

Presenter: Brendan O'Connell

Beyond A Cabinet of Digital Curiosities: Collection as Praxis

How can librarians in a liberal arts setting collaborate with faculty to deepen student engagement with digital collections while also teaching about the process of collecting? Despite challenges faced by many small, liberal arts colleges—understaffing, limited technological resources—we are committed to developing programmatic efforts to help support and sustain digital pedagogy on campus. For the past two years, in partnership with an instructional technologist, an archivist and instructional librarian at Whitman College have attempted to promote innovative assignments that move beyond the research paper by promoting the deployment of Omeka across the curriculum at Whitman College. 

We will discuss two courses that have made extensive use of Omeka. One required students to create their own digital racial archives to see how this project of collecting reproduced or resisted traditional understandings of race in the American context. In subsequent iterations of the course, students have been asked to make some kind of intervention to an extant collection, thus helping underscore students’ own roles as knowledge creators not merely knowledge consumers. Another course required students to create exhibits from pre-populated content that was digitized with the support of a modest institutional grant. Both courses attempted to introduce students to the crucial concepts of provenance and metadata and to the archival practices of arrangement and description as they apply to digital collections and digital collecting. 

Our hope is to demonstrate how others, especially those with limited technological resources, can promote similar types of collaborations on their campuses. We also discuss our strategy for small scale promotion of local digital collections and the ways in which they can be mobilized to support undergraduate research and digital literacy across disciplines. Finally, we will describe possible future directions for ways to continue to reuse and repurpose the collections created through these types of collaborations."

Presenters: Melissa Salrin, Ben Murphy


Speakers
BM

Ben Murphy

Instructional and Research Librarian, Whitman College
avatar for Brendan O'Connell

Brendan O'Connell

Instructional Technology Librarian, Smith College Libraries
I am Instructional Technology Librarian at Smith College Libraries, where I contribute to a variety of emerging projects. I am acutely interested in what academic libraries mean in the liberal arts context. | | Before this, I was a Library Fellow at North Carolina State University Libraries, where I contributed to launching the NCSU Libraries Alt-Textbook Project , designing the D.H. Hill Library Makerspace, and collaborating with faculty on... Read More →
MS

Melissa Salrin

Archivist and Special Collections Librarian, Whitman College and Northwest Archives


Sunday October 25, 2015 2:15pm - 3:15pm
Salon F Pinnacle Hotel

2:15pm

Digital Scholarship & The Liberal Arts in a Newly-Merged Library • Digital Scholarship at Bucknell: It's About Building Relationships
You need this ticket from Eventbrite to sign up: DLF Liberal Arts Colleges Preconference.
Digital Scholarship & The Liberal Arts in a Newly-Merged Library

**10/25/15: Please note: this first portion of the session has been canceled.**

In December, Trinity College announced that it was partnering with edX to produce MOOCs; in March, our president announced the merger of the library and IT organizations, with the CIO taking over both. While either development might well have elicited concern from the faculty, taken together they raised real concern about the library's role on campus. Meanwhile, within the organizations, areas of overlap and shared responsibility have caused both concern and confusion. This paper will discuss some initial efforts of the educational technology (IT) and research education (library) groups to use a shared interest in digital scholarship to give new focus and energy to outreach efforts. Revivifying work in open access and in open educational resources, as well as productive ways of mobilizing digital resources in the classroom, are helping the newly-merged organization to think through both questions of structure and of self-representation.

Presenter: Jason B. Jones

Digital Scholarship at Bucknell: It's About Building Relationships

Charged with creating a digital humanities initiative that was innovative, intentional, and collaborative, Library and Information Technology realized that we required an inclusive approach that opened up digital scholarship to all divisions at Bucknell while emphasizing the liberal arts’ commitment to student engagement. Short answer: it’s about building relationships. 

Ten years ago Bucknell’s Digital Initiatives group, Instructional Technology (ITEC), and Research Services were responsive service providers, but did little to drive innovation. Today, a reimagined ITEC, comprised of instructional technologists, GIS and multi-media specialists, postdocs, and digital scholarship coordinators leads digital scholarship efforts on campus by moving from transactional to transformational interactions in order to foster lasting partnerships. 

As an instructional technology group, we have found that our first interactions with faculty are often helping to develop an assignment for a course. Even in these early conversations, we consult on pedagogical design when discussing timelines, training, digital literacies, privacy, and assessment of multi-modal projects. Moving forward, the relationships we build with faculty and students often involve collaborations on scholarship, multi-semester projects, summer research grants (for students to work with faculty and members of ITEC), making connections across disciplines and divisions, and faculty course redesigns, all of which impact students and their engagement in coursework and scholarly research. 

While there are challenges for building digital scholarship efforts at a LACs, ITEC maintains a unique position as a hybrid group--with strengths in academics and technology--within a merged L&IT division. This allows us to draw on the expertise of our research librarians, web programmers, and systems integration team. Building a cohort of digital practitioners hasn’t been all unicorns and rainbows, there have been learning curves, failures, and workflow challenges arising out of our own success. We’ll be sure to cover it all in twenty minutes and include a picture of a puppy.

Presenters: Emily Sherwood, Matthew Gardzina


Speakers
avatar for Emily Sherwood

Emily Sherwood

Assistant Director of Digital Pedagogy and Scholarship, Bucknell University
Emily Sherwood is the Assistant Director of Digital Pedagogy and Scholarship and an Affiliated Faculty Member in English at Bucknell University. She holds a Ph.D. in English Literature from the Graduate Center, CUNY.


Sunday October 25, 2015 2:15pm - 3:15pm
Salon E Pinnacle Hotel

2:15pm

Long Live the Digital Projects Librarian!
You need this ticket from Eventbrite to sign up: DLF Liberal Arts Colleges Preconference.
Long Live the Digital Projects Librarian!

Once upon a time, the day-to-day duties of the average Digital Projects Librarian were fairly straight forward: develop standards, digitize, apply metadata, repeat. It didn’t take long before those duties expanded to include social networking, online exhibitions, digital preservation, born-digital archives, digital humanities projects, faculty and student collaborations, scholarly communication, and data curation. At larger research institutions, these duties typically increased in size to the point where they required additional staff. Digitization is being outsourced or centralized in conservation and preservation facilities, metadata librarians are replacing traditional catalogers in technical services units, committees oversee social networking, programmers manage repositories and platforms, digital humanities librarians “do” digital humanities, data librarians manage data, and digital archivists rule over born-digital archives. At small liberal arts colleges, where a surplus of specialized staff is quite rare, librarians formerly known as “digital projects librarians” have generally seen their portfolios expand over time without an increase in staff or resources. In this panel, four librarians will start out by sharing identical data points: Who am I? How did I get here? What have been my points of connection to digital projects? After this data-sharing, the panelists will challenge their audience to think about ways to effectively change the role of the digital projects librarian, particularly in small liberal arts colleges, but not exclusively. Pre-conference attendees should come prepared to briefly reflect on the evolution of digital projects and to think critically about the future of the field.

Speakers
avatar for Rebekah Irwin

Rebekah Irwin

Curator and Director, Special Collections & Archives, Middlebury College
I'm the director of Special Collections and Archives at Middlebury College in Vermont. In this role, I oversee the rare books collection, the college archives, and the conservation, preservation, and digitization of Middlebury’s library collections (including born-digital archives). Prior to coming to Middlebury, I was the head of the digital projects and metadata unit at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale University.
avatar for Katie Nash

Katie Nash

College Archivist, Williams College
Katie Nash is the College Archivist and Special Collections Librarian at Williams College. Her work interests include project management, arranging and describing collections according to standards, digital projects, donor and employee relations, and using social media to highlight archival and special collections. Her personal interests include exercising, hiking, yoga, watching movies, and hanging out with friends. Katie is a Certified... Read More →
avatar for Kelcy Shepherd

Kelcy Shepherd

DPLA Network Manager, Digital Public Library of America
The Digital Public Library of America
avatar for Jennifer  Weintraub

Jennifer Weintraub

Digital Archivist/Librarian, Schlesinger Library/ Harvard


Sunday October 25, 2015 2:15pm - 3:15pm
Salon A Pinnacle Hotel

3:15pm

Break
Sunday October 25, 2015 3:15pm - 3:30pm
Foyer (Lower Level) Pinnacle Hotel

3:30pm

Panel: Lead, Follow, or Listen
This fun and interactive panel is designed to ask how Liberal Arts College Libraries can best participate in the big issues confronting digital libraries.

Panelists

Katherine Rowe, Provost and Dean of the Faculty at Smith College (participating remotely via video-chat)

Trevor Muñoz, Assistant Dean for Digital Humanities Research, University of Maryland Libraries and Associate Director, Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH)

Kevin Butterfield, University Librarian, University of Richmond

Angie Beiriger, Digital Assets Librarian, Reed College

Eric Luhrs, Head of Digital Scholarship Services, Lafayette College

Laurie Allen, Coordinator for Digital Scholarship & Services, Haverford College

Bethany Nowviskie, Director, Digital Library Federation

Moderators
avatar for Bethany Nowviskie

Bethany Nowviskie

Director, Digital Research & Scholarship, University of Virginia Library
Tell me what you most want and need from #ourDLF.

Speakers
avatar for Laurie Allen

Laurie Allen

Assistant Director for Digital Scholarship, University of Pennsylvania Libraries
University of Pennsylvania
avatar for Angie Beiriger

Angie Beiriger

Digital Assets Librarian, Reed College
Reed College
avatar for Kevin Butterfield

Kevin Butterfield

University Librarian, University of Richmond
avatar for Eric Luhrs

Eric Luhrs

Director of Digital Scholarship Services, Lafayette College
Eric Luhrs is the Director of Digital Scholarship Services at Skillman Library, Lafayette College, where he leads a team of specialist librarians, a CLIR post-doc, and a VR curator responsible for designing and building digital research projects with faculty partners, developing and supporting the library's digital repository infrastructure, and managing production image and metadata creation for related projects, including Lafayette’s Visual... Read More →
avatar for Trevor Muñoz

Trevor Muñoz

Assistant Dean for Digital Humanities Research, University Libraries/ Associate Director, MITH, University of Maryland


Sunday October 25, 2015 3:30pm - 4:45pm
Salon A Pinnacle Hotel

4:45pm

Wrap-up
You need this ticket from Eventbrite to sign up: DLF Liberal Arts Colleges Preconference.
Closing session for the DLF Liberal Arts Colleges Preconference

Sunday October 25, 2015 4:45pm - 5:00pm
Salon A Pinnacle Hotel
 
Monday, October 26
 

7:00am

Breakfast
Monday October 26, 2015 7:00am - 8:45am
Foyer & Ballroom (2nd Level)

7:00am

Registration & Info Desk
Monday October 26, 2015 7:00am - 5:00pm
Foyer (2nd Level) Pinnacle Hotel

9:00am

Opening Plenary & Keynote Address
• First Nations Welcome by Larry Grant, Musqueam Elder
• Introductory Remarks by Dr. Bethany Nowviskie, Director, Digital Library Federation
• Keynote Address by Dr. Safiya Noble, Assistant Professor in the Department of Education and Information Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles:

Power, Privilege and the Imperative to Act

The landscape of library and information fields is rapidly shifting, as new imperatives and demands push to the fore in support of increasing investments in digital technologies. Yet critical information scholars continue to demonstrate how digital technology and its narratives are shaped by and infused with values that are not impartial, disembodied, or lacking positionality. Technologies consist of a set of social practices, situated within the dynamics of race, gender, class, and politics and in the service of something -- a position, a profit motive, a means to an end. Recently, engagement with digital technologies has become an enticing way of giving voice to marginalization and oppression, and hashtag activism has gained prominence as a potential intervention in forms of organizing, while disrupting traditional notions of how activism and protest should take place. In this talk, Safiya Umoja Noble will discuss the importance of the digitally-enabled academic-activist library community to offer models of intervention and resistance through research, practice and teaching, and the importance of examining the consequences and affordances of LIS activist work in a digital paradigm. By illuminating linkages to power struggles over values, particularly in the context of the digital, we can re-examine information contexts that can engender greater responsibility and imperative to act.


The Opening Plenary is sponsored by DPN, the Digital Preservation Network.

Speakers
avatar for Larry Grant

Larry Grant

Larry Grant, Musqueam elder, was born and raised in Musqueam traditional territory by a traditional hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ speaking Musqueam family. After 4 decades as a tradesman, Larry enrolled in the First Nations Languages Program at UBC, which awoke his memory of the embedded value that the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ language has to self-identity, kinship, culture, territory, and history prior to European contact. He is an Adjunct Professor in the... Read More →
avatar for Louisa Kwasigroch

Louisa Kwasigroch

Director of Development & Outreach, CLIR + DLF
Louisa Kwasigroch is the Director of Development and Outreach for the Council on Library and Information Resources. Ms. Kwasigroch is involved with several programs and projects at CLIR, including the Digital Library Federation and the Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives program. Prior to her work at CLIR, Ms. Kwasigroch was the Director of Marketing and Business Development for Quatrefoil Associates, a museum exhibition design... Read More →
avatar for Safiya Umoja Noble

Safiya Umoja Noble

Assistant Prof., Information Studies, UCLA
Safiya Umoja Noble, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Information Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. She conducts research in socio-cultural informatics; including feminist, historical and political-economic perspectives on computing platforms and software in the public interest. Her research is at the intersection of transnational culture and technology in the design and use of applications on the... Read More →
avatar for Bethany Nowviskie

Bethany Nowviskie

Director, Digital Research & Scholarship, University of Virginia Library
Tell me what you most want and need from #ourDLF.



Monday October 26, 2015 9:00am - 10:30am
Ballroom Pinnacle Hotel

10:30am

Break
Hot and cold beverages can be found outside the session rooms on the Lower Level and Levels 2 & 3.

This break is sponsored by Newgen KnowledgeWorks.


Monday October 26, 2015 10:30am - 10:45am
2nd Level and Lower Level

10:45am

Big Data is History: Curating Explorer's Legacy at the University of Iowa • New Sites for Old: Recoding, Migrating, and Sustaining Established Web Projects
Presentation 1
Big Data is History: Curating Explorer's Legacy at the University of Iowa
Stakeholders across academia are engaged in research data management initiatives, incentivized by funding agency requirements to build services and tools for current and future researchers.

But what is the fate of legacy research data created in the decades before "data management"? Whether held in managed libraries and archives or desk drawers and basements, most research data produced before modern digital storage is captured in outdated formats and accompanied (or not) by wildly variable metadata. Curating old research data compounds many of the challenges of preserving legacy media (e.g. obsolescence, storage, funding) with the considerable domain expertise often required to interpret the data and make it discoverable and usable. Indeed, curating legacy data makes the need for good management all the more apparent.

Librarians and archivists may know enough to determine whether the data contained on a set of physical media is within their collecting scope, but this may do little to help prioritize further curation. How are they to know if the data still have value to science or society? Occasionally a data set is of such clear significance that it warrants extraordinary measures. In 2011, the University of Iowa Libraries became the steward of just such a data set. Data tapes created during the first U.S. satellite mission, Explorer, were found deteriorating in the basement of a campus building after decades of neglect. Explorer's scientific lead was Iowa's James Van Allen, and the data from three 1958 Explorer missions led to the first major discovery of the space age: the Van Allen radiation belts.

This presentation chronicles the librarians, archivists, physicists, audio engineers and journalists who teamed up to preserve this historic research data for the public and the scientific community. Explorer's Legacy (http://explorer.lib.uiowa.edu/) serves as the interactive digital edition which tells the story of this lost-and-found data.

Presenters: Emily Frieda Shaw (The Ohio State University), Matthew Butler (University of Iowa), Hannah Scates-Kettler (University of Iowa)

Presentation 2
New Sites for Old: Recoding, Migrating, and Sustaining Established Web Projects
This panel explores the transformation of two well-established, open access, library-based projects—Voyages: The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database and the peer-reviewed journal Southern Spaces—to assess the challenges and opportunities associated with migrating, enhancing, and sustaining digital publications as web technologies change. It will also unveil an open access Drupal distribution ("e-journal-in-a-box") that enables the production of online scholarly journals through all stages of publication, from administrative back-end workflow to public-facing presentation.

Voyages is the basic reference source for the study of the slave trade by scholars, schools, genealogists, and the general public. Online for seven years, the site draws on four decades of archival research on five continents to offer public access to details of 35,000 slave trading voyages between Africa and the New World from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century. It is one of the first web-based databases to use crowdsourcing to correct existing information and to attract new contributions to its core database. Faced with an uncertain future and possible extinction as its original code becomes obsolete, the Voyages' team is undertaking a complete rewriting of the site's code. Project director and distinguished historian David Eltis will report on the recoding efforts and the expanded capabilities of Voyages' new site, which include a Portuguese translation, enhanced mapping, and a separate interface to augment an intra-American slave trade database.

Now in its second decade, the open access, peer-reviewed, multimedia journal Southern Spaces is completing a migration of the site's content and review and administrative interface to Drupal 7. Southern Spaces managing editor Jesse P. Karlsberg and digital publishing strategist Sarah Melton will discuss building a test/staging environment for the journal, the implementation of a workflow module for tracking the progress of article submissions, redesign considerations, and a resulting "e-journal-in-a-box" that will become available as a publishing platform.

Presenters: Allen Tullos (Emory University), David Eltis (American Academy of Arts and Sciences), Jesse Karlsberg (Emory University), Sarah Melton (Emory University), Elizabeth Milewicz (Duke University)

Speakers
MB

Matthew Butler

Senior Developer, Media Production & Design, University of Iowa Libraries
DE

David Eltis

Professor Emeritus, Emory University
JK

Jesse Karlsberg

Postdoctoral Fellow, Emory Center for Digital Scholarship
avatar for Hannah Scates Kettler

Hannah Scates Kettler

Digital Humanities Librarian, University of Iowa Libraries
Currently involved in public digital scholarship and pedagogy, social media, 3D digital representation and visualization, games and gaming, access and dissemination of higher education and research and big data archaeology.
avatar for Sarah Melton

Sarah Melton

Digital Projects Coordinator, Emory Center for Digital Scholarship
I’m the digital projects coordinator at the Emory Center for Digital Scholarship (ECDS). My work—which revolves around scholarly communication, intellectual property, and data curation—involves coordinating several of our open access publications. Currently, I am the assistant managing editor for the open access, peer-reviewed journal Southern Spaces and on the editorial board for the Atlanta Studies Network. | | I’m also a community... Read More →
EM

Elizabeth Milewicz

Head, Digital Scholarship Services, Duke University
avatar for Emily Shaw

Emily Shaw

Head of Preservation & Reformatting, The Ohio State University Libraries
avatar for Allen Tullos

Allen Tullos

Professor of History, Emory University
A graduate of programs in English, Folklore, and American Studies at the University of Alabama, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Yale University, Allen Tullos is currently a professor in the History Department at Emory University, and serves as co-director of the Emory Center for Digital Scholarship. His research interests include critical spatial and regional studies with an emphasis on the US South; digital humanities... Read More →


Monday October 26, 2015 10:45am - 12:00pm
Salon A Pinnacle Hotel

10:45am

Facilitating Researcher Discovery Across All Disciplines: Challenges and Strategies for Implementing Campus Researcher Profiles for Humanists and Social Scientists • Hacking the Hydra Community
Presentation 1
Facilitating Researcher Discovery Across All Disciplines: Challenges and Strategies for Implementing Campus Researcher Profiles for Humanists and Social Scientists
In recent years, we have seen a proliferation of researcher profile tools to support disciplinary and interdisciplinary discovery of potential collaborators and to serve as a showcase for research. In addition to social media tools designed specifically for researchers (like Research Gate and Academia.edu) and identifier systems (like ResearcherID and ORCID), many universities have also implemented researcher profile systems to aggregate campus research, showcase university research strengths, and facilitate discovery of potential interdisciplinary collaborators both on and off campus. While ostensibly a benefit for all researchers, a majority of these implementations have focused on biomedical and STEM researchers and are often housed in a medical school or college of engineering. A number of universities also are taking a comprehensive approach to the implementation of the systems, with a scope to include faculty and scholars from the humanities and social sciences.

In this presentation, program leaders from both public and private research universities will discuss their implementations of researcher information systems, including:

• Collaboration with other campus units and faculty governance committees to define project goals and build consensus on policy issues
• Decision making about inclusion of social science and humanities faculty
• The specific challenges of identifying humanities publication information (particularly monographs) and how each institution is addressing this challenge
• Communications challenges and best practices for successful launch and promotion of campus researcher profiles

Presenters: Rebecca Bryant (University of Illinois), Ruth Allee (Northwestern University), Kate McCready (University of Minnesota). Co-author: Julie Speer (Virginia Tech)

Presentation 2
Hacking the Hydra Community
How does a nonhierarchical, distributed, open-source community work? This (15-25 minute) presentation provides an overview of Hydra's:

• Governance Model
• Communication & Collaboration Strategies
• Interest Groups and Working Groups
• Training and Education Strategy
• Funding Model (or lack thereof)
• Planning Model

Hydra is a growing community with lots of moving parts and it can appear opaque from the outside. Newcomers often complain about the lack of documentation; adopters often applaud the level of community support available. How do both of these dynamics exist at the same time and what is the community doing to maintain and grow our strengths while addressing its weaknesses.

New and potential Hydra adopters can use the information presented to become more effective participants in the community. Members of other open source communities can learn from what's worked well for us and what hasn't. We would love for the presentation to grow into a longer-term conversation about building sustainable communities around open source library initiatives.

Presenter: Mark Bussey (Hydra Steering Committee), Robin Ruggaber (University of Virginia), Declan Fleming (University California, San Diego)

Speakers
avatar for Ruth Allee

Ruth Allee

Manager, Northwestern Scholars, Northwestern University
avatar for Rebecca Bryant

Rebecca Bryant

Project Manager for Researcher Information Systems, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Mark Bussey

Mark Bussey

Chief Information Leafblower, Data Curation Experts LLC
Data Curation Experts
avatar for Declan Fleming

Declan Fleming

Chief Technology Strategist, UC San Diego Library
avatar for Kate McCready

Kate McCready

Director of Content Services, University of Minnesota - Twin Cities
Kate McCready is the former Project Director of the University of Minnesota's research networking system. In addition to launching the public profiling system, which included coordinating the data harvests, she created and coordinated the communications plan and was the liaison for all researcher and administrator interactions regarding the system.  She has served on several campus committees related to research information management, including... Read More →
avatar for Robin Ruggaber

Robin Ruggaber

Senior Director, Library Experience & Library Chief Technical Officer, University of Virginia
I am drawn to the complex challenges facing our community and the opportunity to protect open availability and access to intellectual and cultural knowledge. Talk to me about community driven open source, strategic, operational or architectural aspects of technology at UVa, our future direction with customer facing services- the physical and the virtual from the prospective of the user.


Monday October 26, 2015 10:45am - 12:00pm
Ballroom I

10:45am

7 Snapshots - Metadata/Linked Open Data/UX
Automating Controlled Vocabulary Reconciliation
Using controlled vocabularies within digital library metadata is essential in order to provide researchers with a consistent and easy to use search experience. The University of Utah has developed a process for cleaning up metadata with an emphasis on ensuring that data corresponds to existing controlled vocabularies. This presentation will demonstrate multiple approaches to data clean-up, including a vendor-based authority control service and using OpenRefine.

Presenter: Anna Neatrour (University of Utah)
Co-Author: Jeremy Myntti (University of Utah)

Meaningless Metadata: Maintaining the Trust of Our Academic Communities
In this potentially controversial snapshot session about the state of metadata in Institutional Repositories and Data Repositories, de-identified example records will be shared that suggest there is an epidemic of dirty metadata in our repositories. Academic communities are trusting Libraries to maintain their academic assets, but the oversight of the metadata quality varies widely between institutions. By taking custody of vast amounts of digital materials, Libraries are committing to provide access to and preservation of these items for the long term. Despite numerous standards, there appears to be little consensus as to the minimum metadata required to uphold this commitment.

Presenters: Mahria Lebow (University of Washington), Cynthia McLellan (British Columbia Institute of Technology)

A Portrait of a Collecting Strength: Mapping MARBL's Twentieth-Century African American Collections with EAD, RDFa, and Network Graphs
Libraries have generated network graphs of special collections that illustrate connections among the people and materials represented across collections, which have created new discovery tools, and challenged our understanding of literary history. The "Portrait of a Collecting Strength" project marks up EAD records of MARBL's collections related to twentieth-century African American writers and artists with linked open data, and then exports RDFa as network data. In this presentation, I will present preliminary thoughts about how network graphs may be used as a critical tool for revealing the history of an institutional archive, the provenance of collections, and processing practices.

Presenter: Anne Donlon (Emory University)

Is there a Ghost in the [Search] Machine? Improving Search UX using Query Analysis and Machine Cues
This snapshot looks at how inferred and contextual aspects of a search query can offer new ways of thinking about the "10 blue links" of a search result page. Data mining contextual bits and pieces requires our using techniques that look to understand the sentiment of search queries and the physical/network locations of our users. I will look at how these components can be brought into a library search prototype by utilizing the residual machine cues inherent to the search act and how basic semantic query analysis can improve the search results by introducing personal context.

Presenter: Jason A. Clark (Montana State University)

The Fast and The Furious: Performance Enhancements for Improving the User Experience of Library Websites
Speed matters. Web pages that load faster create an overall smoother and more enjoyable experience for our users. In this snapshop, librarians from two academic libraries will discuss the history of web performance, detail a multi-step implementation plan for enhancing web performance, and share lessons learned from applying web performance enhancements for library websites. This work is informed by a research study involving the library websites of all 122 DLF member institutions that included performance-based diagnostic and usability testing.

Presenters: Scott Young (Montana State University), Krista Godfrey (Memorial University - Newfoundland)

US IMLS National Digital Platform Priority Area Update
In 2014, IMLS launched a new priority, the National Digital Platform, in several of its competitive grant programs. Broadly speaking, the national digital platform is the combination of software applications, social and technical infrastructure, and staff expertise used by libraries, museums, and archives to provide online content and services to all users in the United States. This presentation will offer a brief illustration of the kinds of work funded in the first year of grants and information about the direction of the second year of this priority area.

Presenter: Maura Marx (Institute of Museum and Library Services)

BigDIVA: Redefining (Re)search
How often do students and researchers move beyond the first page of search returns? According to the latest research, 90% of click-throughs come from the first page of results, with the first result receiving 42% of all click-throughs. It is well known that search and page ranking algorithms determine the order of results from a search query. What if you, the researcher, could see all the results and decide which ones are relevant rather than relying on a computer program? BigDIVA is a new tool for humanists that introduces serendipity into the realm of digital research.

Presenter: Timothy Duguid (Texas A&M University)
Co-Author: Laura Mandell (Texas A&M University)

Speakers
avatar for Jason A. Clark

Jason A. Clark

Head, Library Informatics & Computing, Montana State University
Head, Library Informatics & Computing | Montana State University (MSU) Library
AD

Anne Donlon

CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow, Emory University
TD

Timothy Duguid

Postdoctoral Research Associate, Texas A&M University
I have a PhD in early modern music from the University of Edinburgh and am presently the postdoctoral fellow for the Initiative for Digital Humanities, Media, and Culture at Texas A&M University. My work here has mainly focused on three areas: data visualization, digital peer review, and digital resource aggregation. | | I have also been privileged to work for the Advanced Research Consortium (ARC) while here at A&M. ARC is an... Read More →
avatar for Krista Godfrey

Krista Godfrey

Web Services/Interim Head LITS, Memorial University
Web Services Librarian | Memorial University Libraries
ML

Mahria Lebow

Data Repository Librarian, University of Washington
MM

Maura Marx

Deputy Director of Library Services, IMLS
CM

Cynthia McLellan

Archivist, British Columbia Institute of Technology
avatar for Anna Neatrour

Anna Neatrour

Metadata Librarian, University of Utah
University of Utah
avatar for Scott W. H. Young

Scott W. H. Young

Digital Initiatives Librarian, Montana State University
Assistant Professor and Digital Initiatives Librarian at Montana State University, specializing in user experience, web development, and social media community building.


Monday October 26, 2015 10:45am - 12:00pm
Ballroom II & III

10:45am

Starting with 'Yes, And...': Collaborative Instructional Design in Digital Scholarship
The recent expansion of many libraries' digital scholarship initiatives means a number of digital librarians, repository managers, and technology staff now find themselves responsible for supporting instruction and scholarly services across entire institutions, even as collections and instruction librarians are called upon to integrate advanced technology instruction into their own classroom repertoire. Both groups are often asked to serve as experts for areas on which they have had very little training, and these siloed approaches to digital scholarship initiatives can ultimately disserve our researchers and students. Supportive collaboration between technological experts and scholars is key to successfully designing instructional programming for digital scholarship. This kind of collaboration is inherently locally attuned, cross-disciplinary, and messy. The parts are moving, the people aren't the same, and the content is always changing. The idea that instruction can be reified or even repurposed in this area is fundamentally false. Flexibility, openness and change are guaranteed to be the only constants.

Improv principles and techniques are applicable in any instance of teaching: respect your partner, know your audience, work the room, jump in with both feet, agree agree agree. These techniques take for granted that this form of instruction and collaboration is new for both partners, that neither person is the expert, and that the content and situations will have to be recreated anew in every classroom and workshop.

In this workshop, two librarians and former improv and theater instructors will lead workshop attendees through some of the fundamentals of improv, and reflect upon how these same activities and principles help create an environment of collaboration and openness necessary to support the diverse goals of digital scholarship. Session attendees will leave with creative ideas for digital scholarship instruction and collaboration, and new techniques for working with the many partners involved in advancing digital scholarship.

Speakers
avatar for Kate Dohe

Kate Dohe

Digital Services Librarian, Georgetown University
avatar for Erin Pappas

Erin Pappas

University of Virginia, University of Virginia
Area studies, non-Roman scripts, pedagogy, out-of-the box tools for undergrads, outreach, cheese curds and the general awesomeness of the Midwest.


Monday October 26, 2015 10:45am - 12:00pm
Salon F Pinnacle Hotel

12:00pm

Lunch
Buffet lunch will be available on three levels:
2nd Level: Ballroom and Port of Vancouver
Lobby Level: Tuscany
Lower Level: Salon A

If you are attending a lunch session or workshop (in Salon C, D, E, or F), please proceed to the Lower Level, grab a lunch, and head into one of the session rooms.

If you are attending a lunch session in Port of Singapore (3rd Level), grab lunch on any level and head up to three. 

Monday October 26, 2015 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Foyer and Ballroom (2nd Level), Tuscany, Lower Level (Salon A)

12:15pm

Beyond 'One Org to Rule Them All': Organizing Digital Humanities & Library Communities
Limited Capacity full

Bring your lunch—this session will get started at 12:15.

Digital humanities practice and practitioners have long found a welcoming home in libraries, and DH has long loved its libraries. Library workers around the world have begun organizing around digital humanities, forming professional organizations to address shared issues and needs.

The international Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations (ADHO) recently established a "Libraries and Digital Humanities" Special Interest Group (L&DH SIG), with founding conveners from France, Germany, Mexico, Norway, and the U.S., and a stated mission "to provide the connective tissue" between ADHO organizations and DH initiatives in library organizations.

Our problem is how best to organize ourselves: the many national and international organizations operating in both library and DH spaces share both a desire for interconnectedness and a tradition of individual identities (and of course a shared distaste for duplication of efforts). The combinatorics of this complex set of relations, made more so by our international mission, leads to a frightening proliferation of organizations and organizational ties.

The possible resolutions of this confusion are also legion: Should we seek to unite all these "Lib+DH" organizations into a whole ("One Ring to rule them all"), sending emissaries to like-minded professional organizations? Or should we allow diversity (and chaos) to reign, relying on informal networks to relay information and share expertise? While both options are unrealistic extremes, in fact each possible configuration leads to very practical questions: Should we share email lists, membership lists, publications, meetings, officers?

The ADHO L&DH SIG is of course seeking to establish a relationship with DLF, as well as with many other organizations around the globe. With DLF, as with these others, we have substantial overlap in both formal and informal membership.

We're seeking appropriate and effective organizational structures, governance models, and working metaphors for our shared libraries + digital humanities effort.

Speakers
avatar for Zoe Borovsky

Zoe Borovsky

Librarian for Digital Research and Scholarship, UCLA
University of California - Los Angeles
avatar for Sarah Potvin

Sarah Potvin

Digital Scholarship Librarian, Texas A&M University Libraries
Sarah Potvin is the Digital Scholarship Librarian in the Office of Scholarly Communication in the Texas A&M University Libraries. A co-founder of the dh+lib project and co-convener of the new ADHO digital humanities and libraries SIG, she is interested in the ways that libraries and librarians encounter and advance digital humanities. This year, she is particularly interested in talking about digital asset management systems, geospatial... Read More →
avatar for Glen Worthey

Glen Worthey

Digital Humanities Librarian, Stanford University Libraries
I've been Digital Humanities Librarian in the Stanford University Libraries since 1997, and co-lead the Libraries' new Center for Interdisciplinary Digital Research (CIDR). I hosted the international "Digital Humanities 2011" conference at Stanford, and am currently a member of the Executive Board of the Association for Computers and the Humanities (ACH) and the Steering Committee for the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations (ADHO). My... Read More →


Monday October 26, 2015 12:15pm - 1:20pm
Salon D

12:15pm

Getting a DPLA Service Hub off the Ground: Sharing Experiences, Challenges, Best Practices and Replicable Hub Models
Limited Capacity full

Bring your lunch—this session will get started at 12:15.

Service hubs in the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) network offer a unique statewide or regional opportunity for libraries, archives, museums, and other cultural heritage institutions to pool together resources, whether staff, equipment, funding, or expertise, in order to contribute digital collections records to the DPLA. Currently, the DPLA has almost twenty such service hubs around the country, and its ultimate goal is to cover all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Along with the content hubs from single institutions, the service hubs form the backbone of DPLA's aggregated network of data providers.

The DPLA provides good documentation on how to become a service hub, as well as consultative support for potential service hub applicants. However, regional contexts differ widely -- and not just in terms of harvesting mechanisms and approaches to metadata standardization. As new service hubs form, they need to decide upon governance, policies, funding sources, staffing models, workflows, outreach strategies and other challenging decision points. They often introduce their libraries and archives community to DPLA's open sharing practices, and typically engage that community in establishing standards and best practices.

This working session proposes to bring together various DPLA service hub implementers and address, as a group, the kinds of challenges we faced, or are facing, in standing up our service hubs. What governance and funding models are emerging for service hubs across the network? How have local workflows and staffing been impacted, revised, and sustained for ongoing participation in the DPLA? What are some shareable lessons learned for the community? Besides fruitful discussion of the DPLA service hub experience, the goal is to arrive at an understanding, if not a drafted outline, of replicable hub models that could be further fleshed out, documented, and distributed to organizations or collaboratives wishing to create a service hub.

Speakers
avatar for John  Butler

John Butler

Associate University Librarian for Data & Technology, University of Minnesota
avatar for Emily Gore

Emily Gore

Director for Content, DPLA
avatar for Patricia Hswe

Patricia Hswe

Digital Content Strategist, Penn State University Libraries
In addition to my role as Digital Content Strategist, I lead user services for ScholarSphere, Penn State's repository service. I also co-direct the department of Publishing and Curation Services, a digital scholarship department launched in 2012 to provide a framework to help researchers put into practice a lifecycle management approach to the enterprise of scholarly inquiry. | | Talk with me about digital scholarship, digital humanities... Read More →
avatar for Delphine Khanna

Delphine Khanna

Head, Digital Library Initiatives, Temple University
avatar for Sandra McIntyre

Sandra McIntyre

Director of Services and Operations, HathiTrust
Since May 2016 I have been the director of services and operations for HathiTrust at the University of Michigan office in Ann Arbor. HathiTrust is a partnership of over 120 academic and research institutions, offering a collection of millions of titles digitized from libraries around the world. Our TRAC-certified digital preservation repository provides long-term preservation and access services for public domain and in-copyright content from... Read More →
CT

Chuck Thomas

Executive Director, USMAI Library Consortium, University System of Maryland
avatar for Christopher Vinson

Christopher Vinson

Head of Library Technology, Clemson University Libraries
avatar for Kerri Willette

Kerri Willette

Deputy Director, Metropolitan NY Library Council (METRO)


Monday October 26, 2015 12:15pm - 1:20pm
Salon E Pinnacle Hotel

12:15pm

Project Managers Group Lunch
Limited Capacity full

The DLF Project Managers Group provides a forum for sharing project management methodologies, best practices, latest trends and tools, alongside broader issues such as portfolio management and cross-organizational communication. The DLF Project Managers Group will host a lunch at this year’s forum with breakout group discussions. Come join in on the discussion and connect with other project managers.

Agenda:

 

  • Round robin introductions (10 min)
  • Break into discussion groups (30 min)
  • Report out on group discussion (15 min)
  • Discuss next steps & announcements (10 min)

 

Grab your lunch and join us.

Speakers
avatar for Cristela Garcia-Spitz

Cristela Garcia-Spitz

Digital Library Development Project Manager, ClimateQUAL Implementation Team Co-Chair, UC San Diego Library
UCSD
avatar for Cynthia York

Cynthia York

Project Manager, Johns Hopkins University / Sheridan Libraries
Johns Hopkins University, UX and Project Management


Monday October 26, 2015 12:15pm - 1:20pm
Port of Singapore Pinnacle Hotel

12:15pm

The Best Online Tools Available For Visualization, Publication, & Collaboration
Limited Capacity full

Head down to the lower level (Cordova Level), and grab your lunch—this session, sponsored by Plotly, will get started at 12:15.

**10/26/15** Due to travel issues, the presenter will be attending virtually.

This talk will review the new wave of online tools available for research, data analysis, data visualization, collaboration, publication, and reproducibility. Particular attention will be paid to the importance of these tools for open science and open data.

Presenter: Matt Sundquist (Plotly)

Speakers

Monday October 26, 2015 12:15pm - 1:20pm
Salon C

12:15pm

Increasing Geospatial Awareness: Storing, Managing, Describing & Sharing Geospatial Data
This workshop is a joint effort to introduce working with geospatial data and geospatial metadata from a variety of contexts. As such, it will be a mix of talking and tinkering, with audience questions and interaction encouraged. We will start with an introduction to geospatial data types and metadata standards as well as demonstrations of two data sharing services: the California Digital Library's Dash, which allows for geospatial metadata input and discovery for any data type, and Stanford University Libraries' EarthWorks, which focuses exclusively on geospatial datasets. Next will be a demonstration of how content-management systems like Omeka can be leveraged to assist in the submission of GIS data and the creation of geospatial metadata, as well as an introduction to GeoBlacklight geospatial data indexing software. Looking beyond platforms, there will be some hands-on training on how to manage metadata for the preservation and end-user discovery of several digital geospatial data types including vector and raster data, feature catalogs, georeferenced historic maps, and scholarly research data. Finally, there will be a walkthrough and discussion of how to use geographic information to improve discoverability of a wide range of non-geospatial digital library objects, as well as ensure metadata interoperability with geospatial dataset metadata.

Grab some lunch to enjoy during the initial presentation portion of the workshop.

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Battista

Andrew Battista

Librarian for Geospatial Information Systems, New York University
avatar for Kim Durante

Kim Durante

Metadata Librarian, Stanford University Libraries
avatar for Darren Hardy

Darren Hardy

GIS Software Engineer, Stanford University
avatar for Christina Harlow

Christina Harlow

metadataist
avatar for Matthew McKinley

Matthew McKinley

Digital Project Specialist, UC Irvine Libraries
Digital Project Specialist for University of California, Irvine Libraries, tasked with planning and managing curation of digitized and born-digital campus content.
avatar for Jack Reed

Jack Reed

Geospatial Web Engineer, Stanford University


Monday October 26, 2015 12:15pm - 3:45pm
Salon F Pinnacle Hotel

1:30pm

Collaborative Efforts to Develop Best Practices in Assessment: A Progress Report
Methods for assessment of digital libraries are not yet standardized; as a result, many are at a loss as to how to begin to assess costs, benefits, and usability. To address this crucial gap, after the 2014 DLF meeting the DLF Assessment Interest Group engaged the community to form working groups to address issues with citations, analytics, cost assessment, and user studies. This session will present progress made over the past year. Each of the four groups will present the work completed thus far, followed by a discussion with attendees to help clarify next steps and additional ideas.

Join us tomorrow for the Digital Library Assessment Lunch, hosted by the DLF Assessment Working Group. 

Speakers
MB

Molly Bragg

Digital Collections Program Manager, Duke University Libraries
Duke University
avatar for Joyce Chapman

Joyce Chapman

Assessment Coordinator, Duke University Libraries
avatar for Jody L DeRidder

Jody L DeRidder

Head, Metadata & Digital Services, University of Alabama
My focus is on leveraging available resources, energy and interests to develop collaborative and often innovative solutions to problems we all face. My background is heavily technical, but my approach is very humanistic. I'm actively seeking opportunities in which I can best contribute to the field and meeting needs/improving services.
avatar for Elizabeth Kelly

Elizabeth Kelly

Digital Initiatives Librarian, Loyola University New Orleans
Loyola University New Orleans
ST

Santi Thompson

Head of Digital Repository Services, University of Houston Libraries
University of Houston


Monday October 26, 2015 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Ballroom I

1:30pm

Sharing Your Data with Dataverse (v4.0) • The DRS Project Toolkit: A Scalable Model for Digital Projects
Presentation 1
Sharing Your Data with Dataverse (v4.0)
The Dataverse Project started in 2006 at Harvard's Institute for Quantitative Social Science as an open source software application to share, cite and archive data. From its beginnings, Dataverse has provided a robust infrastructure for data stewards to host and archive data, while offering researchers an easy way to share and get credit for their data. The Dataverse project, started as a repository for social sciences data, has now expanded to benefit a wide range of disciplines and scientific domains (astronomy, life sciences, etc.) leveraging our progress in the social science domain to define and enhance data publishing across all research communities. In particular, as part of the new Dataverse release (v4.0), we have evaluated the features needed in data publishing so data can be properly shared, found, accessed and reused. This session will cover the major changes in Dataverse v4.0 (metadata schemas supported, publishing workflows, support for specific file types, etc) as well as review how to start using Dataverse for an institution.

Presenter: Elizabeth Quigley (Harvard Institute for Quantitative Social Science)

Presentation 2
The DRS Project Toolkit: A Scalable Model for Digital Projects
What role does a digital repository play in an active and evolving digital scholarship environment? While most repositories are built with basic discovery and download features in mind, the interface and user experience of a repository rarely supports the user interaction, deep scholarly analysis, or contextualization that digital scholarship projects often need to effectively share and publish their work. The Northeastern University Library Digital Scholarship Group is endeavoring to bridge the gap between the repository and scholarly project needs by developing the DRS Project Toolkit, a service designed to empower projects to interact with and manipulate content stored in our Digital Repository Service (DRS).

During our presentation, we will discuss the goals for the DRS Project Toolkit 2015 pilot. We will give an overview of the pilot, including the initial call for proposals and how and why we chose the pilot projects. Our presentation will include details on the development of the API to extract data from our repository as well as the development of custom plugins to present the content in Wordpress. We will also explain the decision to go with Wordpress over Omeka for digital project website building. A live demo will demonstrate the implementation and customization that the toolkit provides. We will share our plans for future development and features. Finally, we will engage the larger DLF community through feedback on our model and discussion of problems and solutions with supporting multiple digital projects.

Presenters: Sarah Sweeney (Northeastern University), Eli Zoller (Northeastern University)

Speakers
EQ

Elizabeth Quigley

User Experience Lead, IQSS at Harvard
avatar for Sarah Sweeney

Sarah Sweeney

Digital Repository Manager, Northeastern University
EZ

Eli Zoller

Web Developer and Designer, Northeastern University


Monday October 26, 2015 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Salon A Pinnacle Hotel

1:30pm

6 Snapshots - Digital Humanities/Digital Scholarship
A Hybrid Approach to Digital Humanities Scholarship
The Canadian Writing Research Collaboratory (CWRC) is creating an online research environment built on the Islandora framework and incorporating a suite of analysis, editing and visualization tools meant to foster collaboration in the study of Canadian culture. This snapshot will bring forward some of the challenges and solutions associated with this project, such as the difficulties of transforming a repository into a Virtual Research Environment and establishing a linked open data management workflow. The discussion of these issues and solutions will be framed in the context of sustainability and preservation challenges faced by projects such as CWRC.

Presenter: Mihaela Ilovan (University of Alberta)

Exploring 3D Scanning for the Creation of Digital Cultural Heritage Collections
IUPUI University Library has been digitizing and providing access to community and cultural heritage collections since 2006. Varying formats include: audio, video, photographs, slides, negatives, and text (bound, loose). The library provides access to these collections using CONTENTdm. As 3D technologies become increasingly popular in libraries and museums, IUPUI University Library is exploring the workflows and processes as they relate to 3D artifacts. The library is collaborating with Online Resources Inc., a company that specializes in 3D technology to explore new ways to deliver content to a digital audience.

Presenters: Jennifer Johnson (Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis), JD Schaumberg (Online Resources, Inc.), Anna Proctor (Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis)

Word Lab: Laboratories, Textual Data, and Communities of Practice
This snapshot will discuss the University of Pennsylvania Libraries' Word Lab. Word Lab is a computational text analysis research group that discusses group members' projects, develops skills, studies journal articles and projects, and hosts conversations with other text analysis scholars. Many of the visiting researchers are also part of things called labs -- Stanford Literary Lab, Chicago Text Lab, NULab. In this presentation, I will explore the concept of a text analysis lab, what its implications are, and how our example—in a library—functions to foster experimentation, digital research infrastructure, and research outcomes.

Presenter: Katie Rawson (University of Pennsylvania)

A Tale of Two Digital Projects: Open Source Tools for Awesome User Engagement
What do public media and Flickr have in common with VCU Libraries? Both provided the means for VCU to build upon open source tools and create new ways for users to engage with our digital collections. This snapshot will discuss the use of NPR's Quotable tool in partnership with the Richmond community featured in an oral history project, and will also showcase how the CONTENTdm to Flickr uploader tool built by VCU's web team was used to further user engagement with a unique digital atlas project.

Presenter: Lauren Work (Virginia Commonwealth University)

Decentralized Music Document Image Searching with Optical Music Recognition and the International Image Interoperability Framework
While music libraries around the world are digitizing millions of musical scores, there are currently very few efforts underway at extracting the musical content from these page images and making the music notation available for large-scale search and analysis. With the International Image Interoperability Framework we are performing large-scale optical music recognition on remotely-hosted musical sources, storing the extracted notation locally and indexing them for search, while the original images are held and hosted by a remote institution. Through this we are creating a decentralized common interface for music score searching and analysis.

Presenter: Andrew Hankinson (McGill University)
Co-author: Ichiro Fujinaga (McGill University)

We Are CollectionSpace
This will be an introduction to CollectionSpace, an open-source collections management platform that is designed by a community of professionals just like you. We are building a community and a new solution for collections-holding institutions that is efficient, effective, customizable, intuitive, and affordable. CollectionSpace began as a collaboration amongst three universities, five museums, and a series of community design workshops where we brought together colleagues working with heterogeneous collections and engaged in a dynamic conversation about how together we might develop a solution that focuses on what we share in common as our core mission.

Presenter: Robert Miller (LYRASIS)

Speakers
AH

Andrew Hankinson

Postdoctoral Fellow, McGill University
MI

Mihaela Ilovan

Project Manager, Canadian Writing Research Collaboratory / University of Alberta
avatar for Jenny Johnson

Jenny Johnson

Digital Scholarship Outreach Librarian, IUPUI University Library
RM

Robert Miller

Chief Executive Officer, LYRASIS
avatar for Anna Proctor

Anna Proctor

Digitization Coordinator, IUPUI University Library
IUPUI University Library
avatar for Katie Rawson

Katie Rawson

Coordinator for Digital Research, University of Pennsylvania
Katie Rawson works with faculty, students, and staff to develop digital projects and assess emerging tools and technologies for humanities research. She also manages the British and American Literature collection and serves as a liaison to the English department. Katie has a PhD from the interdisciplinary Graduate Institute for the Liberal Arts at Emory University. She has an MA in English from the University of Mississippi and a BA in... Read More →
JS

JD Schaumberg

Director of Business Development, Online Resources, Inc.
I specialize in collecting 3D data and turning it into useful information. I traditionally work with manufactures and artists, and within the last 3 years branched into the archiving and museums. I supply parts and services for 3d scanning, 3d Printing, and CNC software. My background is in secure data communications and collection for state entities.
avatar for Lauren Work

Lauren Work

Digital Collections Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University


Monday October 26, 2015 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Ballroom II & III

2:30pm

Break
Hot and cold beverages can be found outside the session rooms on the Lower Level and Levels 2 & 3.

This break is sponsored by the Association for Computers and the Humanities and the Canadian Society for Digital Humanities.


Monday October 26, 2015 2:30pm - 2:45pm
2nd Level and Lower Level

2:45pm

A Role for Libraries in Supporting Ethics in Data Research • Recommendations from the MWDL Geospatial Discovery Task Force — Update and Resources
Presentation 1

A Role for Libraries in Supporting Ethics in Data Research

The research library, as part of a university support network for technical researchers, is in a unique position to assist researchers in navigating new, complex data issues of privacy, data reusability, and ethical decision-making. The Supporting Ethics in Data Research project explores the current and potential relationship between campus support networks and computer scientists in addressing emerging ethical issues throughout the research process. Through interviews, a review of ethics policies and protocols, and a literature review, this project examines the role of libraries within an ecosystem of ethical support and guidance across universities to better understand the nature of collaboration taking place and future possibilities.

Presenters: Bonnie Tijerina (Data & Society Research Institute), Emily F. Keller (Data & Society Research Institute)

Presentation 2

Recommendations from the MWDL Geospatial Discovery Task Force — Update and Resources

This project update will inform the DLF community about the outcome of last year's DLF working session on proposed geospatial metadata recommendations developed by the Mountain West Digital Library Geospatial Discovery Task Force. The presenters will demonstrate the new standards, discuss the mechanism for and the results of the feedback from the testing phase, and report on the final resources collected and collaboratively developed by the group. Attendees will leave with an understanding of how to assign geospatial metadata in a standardized way that is easily harvested by national aggregators like the Digital Public Library of America.

Presenters: Liz Woolcott (Utah State University), Anna Neatrour (University of Utah), Sandra McIntyre (Mountain West Digital Library), Rachel Wittmann (Clemson University)



Speakers
avatar for Emily Keller

Emily Keller

Project Coordinator for Ethics in, Data & Society Research Institute
avatar for Sandra McIntyre

Sandra McIntyre

Director of Services and Operations, HathiTrust
Since May 2016 I have been the director of services and operations for HathiTrust at the University of Michigan office in Ann Arbor. HathiTrust is a partnership of over 120 academic and research institutions, offering a collection of millions of titles digitized from libraries around the world. Our TRAC-certified digital preservation repository provides long-term preservation and access services for public domain and in-copyright content from... Read More →
avatar for Anna Neatrour

Anna Neatrour

Metadata Librarian, University of Utah
University of Utah
avatar for Bonnie Tijerina

Bonnie Tijerina

Researcher/ President, Data & Society/ ER&L
Bonnie Tijerina is a librarian, entrepreneur and library community convener. She is currently a Data & Society Fellow at the Data & Society Institute in New York City. She is founder of ER&L (Electronic Resources & Libraries) conference and organization, created to facilitate communication and foster collaboration among information management and e-resources professionals in libraries. Bonnie has worked in academic libraries for... Read More →
avatar for Rachel Wittmann

Rachel Wittmann

Parks Metadata Specialist, Clemson University Libraries
avatar for Liz Woolcott

Liz Woolcott

Head, Cataloging and Metadata Services, Utah State University
Utah State University


Monday October 26, 2015 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Ports of the World Pinnacle Hotel

2:45pm

Linked Data on the Ground
This session is an investigation of the operational impacts on libraries of transitioning to a linked data ecosystem. To date, the majority of linked data efforts and research have focused on the end-user search and discovery benefits of transitioning to linked data. There has been very little investigation of the impact that the transition from MARC, or other field-based approaches to bibliographic work, would have on the daily operations of libraries. Would it be optimal to convert all library operations and data stores to a native triples ecosystem? Or, would it make more sense to maintain a field-based data store and programmatically expose data as triples? In either case, what software would we use to accomplish these tasks, and how would the adoption of this software effect current library vendor relations and internal workflows? Finally, what would be the business impact in terms of work efficiency and librarian training?

Linked Data on the Ground will address these and similar questions by highlighting the work of three initiatives directly engaged in the implementation of linked data native library operations: The UC Davis' IMLS funded BIBFLOW project, the collaborative effort of the National Library of Medicine, George Washing University, and UC Davis to develop and implement a BIBFRAME model for PCC Core bibliographic data, and George Washington University's efforts to create and expose Schema.org micro data. These are amongst the most ambitious efforts yet to integrate linked data into the daily operations of the library; and the experiences and lessons learned from these efforts to deal with linked data on the ground fill an important gap in libraries' understanding of the linked data landscape and help to complete the puzzle of applications of linked data in the library community.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Cummings

Michael Cummings

Library Systems Coordinator, George Washington University
avatar for Gloria Gonzalez

Gloria Gonzalez

Library Strategist, Zepheira
avatar for Xiaoli Li

Xiaoli Li

Head of Content Support Services, UC Davis
JS

Jackie Shieh

Resource Description Coordinator, George Washington University
CG

Carl G Stahmer, PhD

Director of Digital Scholarship, UC Davis


Monday October 26, 2015 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Ballroom I

2:45pm

6 Snapshots - Process I
Putting Your Mouth Where Your Money Is: Talking About Digital Library Budgeting
Library budgets have traditionally been referred to as "Acquisitions Budgets" reflecting the purchase of and subscriptions to information resources. Times have changed and our language needs to reflect new and emerging efforts and priorities supported by libraries. This snapshot will engage and energize the audience about how budgets reflect organizational missions and priorities and how libraries need to initiate and lead a change in the conversation from being seen as a "bank account for licensing platforms." Libraries support local technology infrastructures, discover and surface information, provide access and services, and collaborate with fellow researchers in scholarly communication and data processes.

Presenter: Doralyn Rossmann (Montana State University)

Increasing Transparency: University of Michigan's Front Door Process
Despite our best efforts, colleagues at the University of Michigan Library consistently desire more information about their IT projects: Who will be doing the work? When will the work begin? When will the project be done?

In an attempt to increase transparency, the Library IT unit has developed a process to gather project requests into a centralized space and to provide a simplified project queue that is accessible to everyone in the organization. We will share how this new workflow has brought valuable insights into how we communicate with our Library colleagues and learn from others about similar efforts.

Presenter: Meghan Musolff (University of Michigan)

How to Create (and Keep Creating) a Digital Projects Workflow
How do you communicate your digitization process to your stakeholders? The Digital Library Production Service unit at the University of Michigan Library developed a digital projects workflow to serve as a communication tool during the planning stages of new projects. This workflow, now beginning its fourth iteration, allows us to effectively address common digitization issues (such as the lack of metadata, rights and permission investigations and content curation) with our stakeholders both within and outside of the Library. We look forward to sharing our workflow and process, and hearing from others about similar communication efforts.

Presenter: Kat Hagedorn (University of Michigan)

Leveraging Experience and Expertise: Creating Campus-wide Digital Services
At UC Santa Cruz (UCSC), the Digital Initiatives team has been engaged in digitizing special collections materials for over a decade and is just now navigating the thorny process of making such services available for the entire campus. With both political and technical challenges in mind, we seek to ask: how can we leverage skills and expertise developed on our own collections in response to faculty projects and campus wide initiatives? In other words, how can we scale and support the kinds of digitization, OCR processing, hosting, and digital object preservation work we have done internally for faculty?

Presenters: Rachel Deblinger (University of California, Santa Cruz), Susan Perry (University of California, Santa Cruz)

Policies for Data Repositories: Experiences at Temple University
Policy development for institutional repositories is a complex process that requires legal, technical, and administrative expertise from a variety of institutional units. Temple University Libraries' repository service implementation team consulted with University Council, Computer Services, Office of the Vice Provost for Research, and the repository technical development team and administrators within the Libraries to draft policies for their repository pilot project and for the permanent installation. This presentation discusses the steps taken by this team to create these policies, the lessons learned throughout the process, and the current state of their policy development.

Presenters: Margaret Janz (Temple University), Gretchen Sneff (Temple University)

How Many Partners Does it Take to Screw in a IIIF Lightbulb??
Harvard, unlike your institution I am sure, is a distributed organization that presents several bureaucratic barriers to allocating funding for new projects. This talk will present an interesting tale of collaboration between multiple units within a large organization to gain internal funding, that ultimately leads to a significant open source collaboration with the larger library community on the Mirador image viewer and the International Image Interoperability Framework.

Presenter: Randy Stern (Harvard University)
Co-Author: V. Judson Harward (Harvard University)

Speakers
avatar for Rachel  Deblinger

Rachel Deblinger

Digital Humanities Specialist, UC Santa Cruz
@racheldeblinger
avatar for Kat Hagedorn

Kat Hagedorn

Project Manager for Digital Projects, University of Michigan Library
University of Michigan
avatar for Margaret Janz

Margaret Janz

Science & Engineering Librarian, Temple University
Margaret is the Science & Engineering Librarian at Temple University. She is interested in and tries to promote digital information literacy, especially in regard to scholarly communication and data management practices.
avatar for Meghan Musolff

Meghan Musolff

Program Manager for Library IT Services, Training, & Assessment, University of Michigan Library
avatar for Susan Perry

Susan Perry

Head of Digital Initiatives, University of California, Santa Cruz
UC Santa Cruz, United States of America
avatar for Doralyn Rossmann

Doralyn Rossmann

Head of Collection Development, Montana State University Library
Montana State University
avatar for Gretchen Sneff

Gretchen Sneff

Head of the Science & Engineering Library, Temple University
RS

Randy Stern

Director Systems Development, Harvard University Library Tech Services


Monday October 26, 2015 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Salon A Pinnacle Hotel

3:45pm

Break
Snacks can be found outside the session rooms on the Lower Level and Levels 2 & 3.

This break is sponsored by Electronic Resources & Libraries.


Monday October 26, 2015 3:45pm - 4:00pm
2nd Level and Lower Level

4:00pm

Poster Session and Lightning Round
The poster session starts with a lightning round where each presenter has one minute to pitch their poster to the conference audience. Please wait to visit the poster until after the lightning round.

Like last year, attendees can vote for their favorite poster. The winning poster presenter gets a DLF Forum 2016 (Milwaukee) registration, and a voter is randomly selected to also win 2016 registration.

2015 DLF Forum Posters

A Barbie Doll, Pirate Booty & Grandma: Transforming Museums
Robert Miller (LYRASIS—a 2015 DLF Forum Sponsor)

A Genealogy of Reading, a Small, Linked Open Data Project
Purdom Lindblad (University of Virginia), Eric Rochester (University of Virginia), Jeremy Boggs (University of Virginia)

Accelerating Access: Making Open Access Policies Work
Kelsey Rosell (Symplectic—a 2015 DLF Forum Sponsor)

Avalon Media System - Video and Audio Repository for Digital Libraries: What's New in Version 4
Deborah Cane (Northwestern University)

Building a Better Scanner: Library IT and Student Engagement
Kat Hagedorn (University of Michigan), Meghan Musolff (University of Michigan)

Building Digital Scholarship Community with a Graduate Affiliates Program
John Russell (University of Oregon)

Building, Testing, & Ingesting into DPN – Working Through How to Preserve Digital Content for the Long Term.
Evviva Weinraub (Digital Preservation Network—a 2015 DLF Forum Sponsor), Dave Pcolar (Digital Preservation Network)

Creating Digital Partnerships for Cross Campus Collaboration: Connecting Independent Libraries and Archives through the Digital Scholarship Hub at the Library.
A. Miller (Middle Tennessee State University), Bonnie Allen (Middle Tennessee State University)

Creating Digital Scholarly Editions with Juxta Editions
Nick Laiacona (Performant—a 2015 DLF Forum Sponsor)

Dashboard Metrics for Scholarly Activity at a Small University: Open, Free/mium, Premium
Dana McFarland (Vancouver Island University)

DataQ: A Collaborative Platform for Answering Research Data Questions in Libraries
Yasmeen Shorish (James Madison University), Sarah Pickle (The Claremont Colleges), Christie Wiley (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Megan Brenahan (Tufts University), Andrew Johnson (University of Colorado Boulder)

Elsevier ScienceDirect Pilot Program for Innovative Institutional Repositories
Letitia Mukherjee (Elsevier—a 2015 DLF Forum Sponsor)

The Expanding Archive: Denison LGBTQ Past / Present / Future
Shannon Robinson (Denison University)

Exploring Open Science
Bret Davidson (North Carolina State University), Ekatarina Grguric (North Carolina State University)

Find Your Park's Metadata
Rachel Wittman (Clemson University), Josh Morgan (Clemson University), Christopher Vinson (Clemson University)

Finding the Signal in the Noise: Normalizing Data Management into Library Literacy Programs
Ann Hubble (University of California, Santa Cruz), Christy Caldwell (University of California, Santa Cruz), Christy Hightower (University of California, Santa Cruz)

Geospatial Recommendations for the Spatially Challenged
Anna Neatrour (University of Utah), Liz Woolcott (Utah State University)

Libraries and Digital Humanities: ADHO Special Interest Group
Zoe Borovsky (University of California, Los Angeles), Sarah Potvin (Texas A&M University), Glen Worthey (Stanford University)

Living with the Legacy: Inheriting Problematic Digital Projects
Krystal Thomas (Florida State University)

MagicBox
Jennifer Royall (Content Conversion Specialists—a 2015 DLF Forum Sponsor), George Schlukbier (Content Conversion Specialists)

Navigating the Research Information Management Ecosystem
Marlee Givens (Georgia Institute of Technology), Susan Wells Parham (Georgia Institute of Technology)

Research Data as Part of A Personal Archive: Personal Archiving Consultation as Part of Research Data Services
Jordan Bass (University of Manitoba), Mayu Ishida (University of Manitoba)

ResearchPad: Open Access Mobile Cataloging for Libraries
Patrick Martinent (Newgen KnowledgeWorks—a 2015 DLF Forum Sponsor)

Restoring Telidon/NAPLPS Computer Graphics from the Early 1980s
John Durno (University of Victoria—a 2015 DLF Forum Sponsor)

SobekCM 5.0 : Migrating to a REST API and Microservice Architecture
Mark Sullivan (Sobek Digital Hosting and Consulting, LLC—a 2015 DLF Forum Sponsor)

Synopticity and RDF Implementation in Special Collections
Erik Radio (University of Kansas)

System Development for Automatic Ingestion of Large Amount of Data and Associated Metadata using REST API – Scope of DSpace
Nushrat Khan (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), William Ingram (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Using the Virtual-private Cloud Model to Implement Sustainable, Scalable Digital Library Collections: A Case Study (based on Islandora).
Gail Truman (Truman Technologies—a 2015 DLF Forum Sponsor)

Who Are You and Why Are You Here? Assessing the Scholarly Impact of Duke Digital Collections
Molly Bragg (Duke University), Will Sexton (Duke University)

Who is That and What Do They Do? Showing Connections between External Services and Your Institutional Repository
Daniel Draper (Colorado State University), Suzi White (Colorado State University)


Moderators
avatar for Oliver Bendorf

Oliver Bendorf

DLF Program Associate, CLIR+DLF
Oliver Bendorf is the Program Associate at the Digital Library Federation, where he edits the website, writes and draws things, and has a keen interest in supporting outreach to diverse practitioner communities including iSchools and LGBT. He holds an MFA in Poetry and an MLIS, both from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and he has presented and taught internationally on topics including visual composition (cartooning, color, infographics, and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for GailTruman

GailTruman

Principal Consultant, Truman Technologies
My company provides consulting around digital preservation, including digital storage and open source repositories and techniques as well as web archiving. Currently consulting for the CA State Library and the California Revealed project and also CA Historical Society. Outside of work you'll find me hiking the hills of California. Let's talk digital preservation over a drink!
JB

Jordan Bass

Archivist, University of Manitoba Libraries
avatar for Zoe Borovsky

Zoe Borovsky

Librarian for Digital Research and Scholarship, UCLA
University of California - Los Angeles
MB

Molly Bragg

Digital Collections Program Manager, Duke University Libraries
Duke University
CC

Christy Caldwell

Science & Engineering Librarian, Univ of Calif Santa Cruz
DC

Deborah Cane

Repository Community Manager, Northwestern University
BD

Bret Davidson

Digital Technologies Development Librarian, North Carolina State University
DD

Daniel Draper

Digital Repositories Librarian, Colorado State University
avatar for John Durno

John Durno

Head, Library Systems, University of Victoria
For the past ten years I've been Head of Library Systems at the University of Victoria, where I manage the exceptional team responsible for building and maintaining the Libraries' IT environment. My current research interests include digital forensics, digital archaeology, and other excuses to muck about with old hardware and software.
avatar for Marlee Givens

Marlee Givens

Strategic Initiatives Manager, Georgia Tech Library
avatar for Eka Grguric

Eka Grguric

Libraries Fellow, North Carolina State University
NCSU Libraries Fellow | North Carolina State University Libraries
avatar for Kat Hagedorn

Kat Hagedorn

Project Manager for Digital Projects, University of Michigan Library
University of Michigan
AH

Ann Hubble

Librarian, University of California, Santa Cruz
MI

Mayu Ishida

Research Services Librarian, University of Manitoba
avatar for Nushrat Khan

Nushrat Khan

NCSU Libraries Fellow, NCSU Libraries
I am currently working on different projects related to Digital Libraries and Linked Data, but I am also interested in Digital Humanities, Digital Scholarship and Privacy issues.
avatar for Nick Laiacona

Nick Laiacona

President, Performant Software Solutions
PL

Purdom Lindblad

Head of Graduate Programs, Scholars' Lab, University of Virginia Libraries
avatar for D McFarland

D McFarland

Librarian, Vancouver Island University
RM

Robert Miller

Chief Executive Officer, LYRASIS
avatar for Josh Morgan

Josh Morgan

Digital Projects Manager, Clemson University Libraries
avatar for Letitia Mukherjee

Letitia Mukherjee

Market Development Manager, Elsevier
Letitia Mukherjee is Market Development Manager Sharing Platforms for ScienceDirect. Letitia is responsible for the development and adoption of ScienceDirect services that help researchers to find, share and use ScienceDirect content on sharing platforms. Prior to this, Letitia has held various roles in marketing, strategy and business development at LexisNexis in Amsterdam and South Africa. Prior to joining RELX, Letitia has worked in the... Read More →
avatar for Meghan Musolff

Meghan Musolff

Program Manager for Library IT Services, Training, & Assessment, University of Michigan Library
avatar for Anna Neatrour

Anna Neatrour

Metadata Librarian, University of Utah
University of Utah
SP

Susan Parham

Digital Scholarship Librarian, Georgia Tech Library
avatar for David Pcolar

David Pcolar

CTO, Digital Preservation Network
Dave is the Chief Technology Officer for the Digital Preservation Network and a Technical Manager at Internet2. He is responsible for defining technical strategy and development, and implementation of technical and operational services for DPN.
avatar for Sarah Pickle

Sarah Pickle

Assessment Librarian, The Claremont Colleges Library
Claremont Colleges Library
avatar for Sarah Potvin

Sarah Potvin

Digital Scholarship Librarian, Texas A&M University Libraries
Sarah Potvin is the Digital Scholarship Librarian in the Office of Scholarly Communication in the Texas A&M University Libraries. A co-founder of the dh+lib project and co-convener of the new ADHO digital humanities and libraries SIG, she is interested in the ways that libraries and librarians encounter and advance digital humanities. This year, she is particularly interested in talking about digital asset management systems, geospatial... Read More →
ER

Erik Radio

Metadata Librarian, University of Kansas
ER

Eric Rochester

Senior R&D Developer, Scholars' Lab, University of Virginia Libraries
avatar for Kelsey Rosell

Kelsey Rosell

Director of Sales, Symplectic
JR

Jennifer Royall

Technical Consultant, CCS GmbH
avatar for John Russell

John Russell

Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of Oregon
GS

George Schlukbier

Director North America, CCS GmbH
avatar for Will Sexton

Will Sexton

Head, Digital Production Initiatives, Duke University Libraries
MS

Mark Sullivan

CIO, Sobek Digital Hosting & Consulting
avatar for Krystal Thomas

Krystal Thomas

Digital Archivist, Florida State University
avatar for Christopher Vinson

Christopher Vinson

Head of Library Technology, Clemson University Libraries
EW

Evviva Weinraub

Services Manager, Digital Preservation Network
avatar for Rachel Wittmann

Rachel Wittmann

Parks Metadata Specialist, Clemson University Libraries
avatar for Liz Woolcott

Liz Woolcott

Head, Cataloging and Metadata Services, Utah State University
Utah State University
avatar for Glen Worthey

Glen Worthey

Digital Humanities Librarian, Stanford University Libraries
I've been Digital Humanities Librarian in the Stanford University Libraries since 1997, and co-lead the Libraries' new Center for Interdisciplinary Digital Research (CIDR). I hosted the international "Digital Humanities 2011" conference at Stanford, and am currently a member of the Executive Board of the Association for Computers and the Humanities (ACH) and the Steering Committee for the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations (ADHO). My... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for Plotly

Plotly

Collaborative data science. Plotly is the easiest way to graph and share your data.


Monday October 26, 2015 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Ballroom Pinnacle Hotel

5:30pm

Reception (Happy 20th Birthday, DLF!)
Join us to celebrate DLF's 20th birthday at our opening reception, which will start after the poster session's lightning round. Take in the 360° views of Vancouver from the top of the hotel. Cocktails and light fare will be served.

Monday October 26, 2015 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Vistas (19th Floor)
 
Tuesday, October 27
 

7:00am

Breakfast
Tuesday October 27, 2015 7:00am - 8:45am
Foyer & Ballroom (2nd Level)

8:00am

Registration & Info Desk
Tuesday October 27, 2015 8:00am - 5:00pm
Foyer (2nd Level) Pinnacle Hotel

9:00am

Linked Open Data at the American Art Collaborative & Yale Center for British Art: Better Engagement & Research • RDF in the Real World: Lessons in Morphing Metadata • Linked Data for Libraries Project
Presentation 1
Linked Open Data at the American Art Collaborative and Yale Center for British Art: Paving the Way for Better Engagement and Research
While collaboration and information sharing has long been a tradition among libraries, it is relatively new for most museums. However, with the impact of technology and social media more museums have become interested in reaching beyond their space to collaborate with other institutions and to broaden their reach to help audiences of all ages learn about and enjoy art. Key among the technology changes that are impacting museums, libraries, and archives is the Semantic Web and in particular Linked Open Data (LOD).

LOD It is a means of publishing data so that it can be interconnected and become more useful. With LOD the silos of museum websites can disappear and audiences can browse across museums. As a result LOD can help museums make collections more discoverable, help tell fuller stories about objects and provide more meaningful content and better support research.

While there are large scale collaborative projects such as Europeana and DPLA using LOD, knowledge of best practices in how to implement LOD is still nascent within the museum community. Now a relatively new initiative called the American Art Collaborative (AAC) is helping museums learn about LOD and is about to publish a demonstration project that will connect the American works of art across 14 institutions. This session will present the thinking behind AAC and its roadmap. It will zero in on the value of LOD for museums and provide research examples.

The Yale Center for British Art (YCBA) is collaborating with the AAC especially where mapping to the CIDOC-Conceptual Reference Model (CIDOC-CRM) is concerned. The presentation will detail the specific role of this ontology over others, and offer some suggestions for tools supporting data modeling activities. Finally the notions of authority and trust in the network environment will be discussed in the context of scholarly research.

Presenters: Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass (Yale Center for British Art), Eleanor Fink (American Art Collaborative)

Presentation 2
RDF in the Real World: Lessons in Morphing Metadata
Resource Description Framework (RDF) has entered the metadata scene for libraries in a major way over the last few years. While the promise of its Linked Data capabilities is exciting, the realities of changing data models, encoding practices, and even ontologies can put a check on that excitement. This session will explore these issues and discuss when this is worth doing and how to go about doing it.

It is an interesting time for metadata and there are a multitude of considerations for using RDF and linked data. Current metadata use should be evaluated to determine the purpose of any data that exists and the standards being used. Approaching RDF does not necessarily mean just a transformation of metadata elements. Additionally, the purpose of the data and how it is stored can affect modeling relationships in RDF. Does a single standard still work as a single RDF ontology to express those properties? Are there implications to incorporating multiple RDF ontologies to express the same information? Another concern is the RDF capabilities of digital repository technology. If a repository, such as Fedora 4, can handle RDF properties, what exactly does that mean and what does management of the metadata on those objects look like?

A final consideration is the fact that expressing metadata with RDF is not the same as having metadata be Linked Data. Approaches for managing that shift will be discussed and compared in various scenarios, including creating a new collection or repository of objects versus migrating objects that already have metadata in place.

This session will delve into the realities of using RDF to describe and store data for a digital library project—the benefits, the limitations, what it means to make this kind of change, and ways to approach this work.

Presenter: Juliet Hardesty (Indiana University)


Presentation 3
The Linked Data for Libraries Project: A Progress Report
How can linked data leverage the intellectual value that librarians and scholars add to information resources? How can we transcend traditional (mostly bibliographic) data silos within libraries to use the full web of data as we describe, annotate, organize, select, and use those resources? Above all, how can we move beyond theory and experimentation to practice, and practice at scale? These are the questions that the Linked Data for Libraries (LD4L) project (http://ld4l.org) has explored since January of 2014.

We will report on this Mellon-funded, two-year initiative, which is a partnership of Cornell University Library, Stanford University Libraries, and the Harvard Library Innovation Lab. The project is producing an ontology, architecture, and set of tools that work both within and across individual institutions in an extensible network. The partners have made some surprising discoveries in their efforts to link data from bibliographic resources for well-described assets (the catalog) with other institutional data stores, including people's scholarly profiles (from VIVO, Harvard Faculty Finder, and Stanford CAP), curation and annotation data, and information about usage. We've also sought to identify the workable elements of relevant ontologies (including BIBFRAME, VIVO-ISF, OAI-ORE, PAV, and others); best practices in leveraging global identifiers (like VIAF, ORCID, ISNI, and OCLC Works), and a chain of usable tools for converting and managing linked data.

During this interactive session we will also share the results of the LD4L Workshop, which brought together fifty linked data experts at Stanford in February 2015 and provided extensive review on the state of linked data in libraries from across the world, and canvass the DLF Forum participants for their views on what is most promising, and most needed, to move Linked Data into wide-scale practice for Libraries.

Presenters: Dean Krafft (Cornell University), Tom Cramer (Stanford University)

Speakers
avatar for Tom Cramer

Tom Cramer

Assistant University Librarian & Director for Digital Library Systems & Services, Stanford University
Hydra, Hydra-in-a-Box, Blacklight, Fedora, IIIF, Web Archiving, Linked Data, geospatial services, open source, community.
ED

Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass

Collections Data Manager, Yale Center for British Art
Emmanuelle is currently the Collections Information Manager at the Yale Center for British Art. In her current role, she oversees the creation of and access to the museum’s collections data. She plays the lead role in ensuring its intellectual and technical integrity. She identifies and implements new data standards and technologies to disseminate to as wide an audience as possible as well as to support the scholarly mission of the... Read More →
EF

Eleanor Fink

American Art Collaborative Manager, American Art Collaborative
avatar for Juliet L. Hardesty

Juliet L. Hardesty

Metadata Analyst, Indiana University
Indiana University
avatar for Dean Krafft

Dean Krafft

Chief Technology Strategist, Cornell University Library
I'm working on a number of projects: ILS replacement, Linked Data for Libraries, VIVO, campus IT models, web archiving, Hydra, and IIIF, among others.


Tuesday October 27, 2015 9:00am - 10:30am
Ballroom II & III

9:00am

Training Up and Reaching Out: Library Strategies to Coordinate Research Data Management on Campus • Data Management Plans as a Research Tool
Presentation 1
Training Up and Reaching Out: Library Strategies to Coordinate Research Data Management on Campus
As scholarly products beyond traditional publications are increasingly curated and shared, academic libraries are playing a growing role in supporting research data management (RDM) needs at their institutions. We are helping build collaborations and infrastructure across campus that faculty and students require for modern, increasingly open scholarship. But even with these efforts underway, the question remains: how can we efficiently and effectively integrate RDM into research activities on campus?

In this session, a panel of current and recent CLIR postdoctoral fellows working in RDM at five different institutions will share how they are working in a variety of ways to embed RDM practices and support in research workflows. Researchers by training and members of library service groups, CLIR fellows are particularly well situated to understand the scholarly operations of these institutions and the challenges of implementing research support services.

Daniels will speak about Vanderbilt's efforts to build connections within the library in order to alert faculty and students to RDM tools and services through workshops and tool-specific trainings. Pickle from Penn State will address her library's Research Data Working Group, comprising diverse library faculty and staff and aiming to become a community of practice where participants learn from each other and produce formal RDM guidance. Van Gulick will discuss the Carnegie Mellon's Libraries'-coordinated Data Management Steering Committee, which brings together stakeholders from offices across campus to prioritize RDM at the university and develop optimal resources for their researchers. Calvert will present research on the current level of staff expertise and skill in RDM services at UCLA. Lastly, Simms will present on the California Digital Library's (University of California Curation Center) approach to offering system-wide RDM tools and services to many diverse campuses, which has involved pairing these resources with library-based coordination efforts specific to local needs.

Presenters: Morgan Daniels (Vanderbilt University), Ana Van Gulick (Carnegie Mellon University), Sarah Pickle (The Claremont Colleges), Scout Calvert (University of California, Los Angeles), Stephanie Simms (California Digital Library)

Presentation 2
Data Management Plans as a Research Tool
As funding agencies increasingly require evidence of sharing and archiving research data, many academic libraries are developing or modifying research data management (RDM) services. These services include outreach regarding funder requirements, assistance with planning for data management, and digital curation services to help researchers manage, share and archive data. These service developments are driving an increasing demand for mechanisms to better understand researcher needs and practices.

An analysis of data management plans (DMPs) can uncover important insights into local RDM practices. As a document produced by researchers themselves, DMPs provide a window into researchers' data knowledge, practices, and needs—a formal analysis of DMPs can provide a means to develop data services responsive to the needs of local data producers.

To assist librarians in a review of DMPs, the IMLS- funded "Data management plans as A Research Tool (DART) Project" has developed an analytic rubric to standardize the review of NSF data management plans. Our rubric allows librarians to utilize DMPs as a research tool that can shape decisions about the provision of research data services. It enables librarians who may have no direct experience in applied research or RDM to become better informed about researchers' data. The rubric can be used to identify strengths, gaps and weaknesses in researchers' understanding of data management concepts and practices, as well as existing opportunities and barriers in applying best practices.

This panel will consist of data specialists from the project's five research partners. We will describe our methodology for developing the analytic rubric, share the results of DMP analyses at our respective academic institutions, discuss broader trends and observations across institutions, and describe how the results are informing the evolution of services at our respective libraries.

Presenters: Susan Wells Parham (Georgia Institute of Technology), Patricia Hswe (Penn State University), Brian Westra (University of Oregon), Amanda Whitmire (Oregon State University)

Speakers
avatar for Scout Calvert

Scout Calvert

CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow for Data Curation, University of California, Los Angeles
My academic background is in science and technology studies. My recent research projects are in an area I call the social life of data. I am particularly interested in how people use genomic data in citizen science and citizen history projects, particularly cattle breeding and genealogy. I also have long professional experience in libraries, as well as three years teaching experience in MLIS programs. My academic and professional experience... Read More →
MD

Morgan Daniels

CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow for Data Curation, Vanderbilt University
avatar for Ana Van Gulick

Ana Van Gulick

CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow for Data Curation, Carnegie Mellon University
As a CLIR fellow at Carnegie Mellon I am working as part of a team to expand our research data services. As we work to build out new tools and services including data management education, an institutional data repository, and support for operational data I try to bring a researcher's perspective into the library. I also serve as the data liaison for the psychology department and brain sciences and am consulting on materials for the BrainHub... Read More →
avatar for Patricia Hswe

Patricia Hswe

Digital Content Strategist, Penn State University Libraries
In addition to my role as Digital Content Strategist, I lead user services for ScholarSphere, Penn State's repository service. I also co-direct the department of Publishing and Curation Services, a digital scholarship department launched in 2012 to provide a framework to help researchers put into practice a lifecycle management approach to the enterprise of scholarly inquiry. | | Talk with me about digital scholarship, digital humanities... Read More →
SP

Susan Parham

Digital Scholarship Librarian, Georgia Tech Library
avatar for Sarah Pickle

Sarah Pickle

Assessment Librarian, The Claremont Colleges Library
Claremont Colleges Library
SS

Stephanie Simms

Research Data Specialist, California Digital Library
avatar for Brian Westra

Brian Westra

Lorry I. Lokey Science Data Services Librarian, University of Oregon
Brian works with researchers in the sciences to help them plan for, manage, publish and preserve their research data.
avatar for Amanda Lea Whitmire

Amanda Lea Whitmire

Data Management Specialist, Oregon State University


Tuesday October 27, 2015 9:00am - 10:30am
Ballroom I

9:00am

Update on Spotlight: A Self-Service Tool... • Beyond the Early Modern OCR Project • APRICOT: Pedagogical Hub for Medieval Studies • Mirador: A Cross-Repository Image Comparison and... • Getting It Together! Automating Standardized Technical...
Presentation 1
Update on Spotlight: A Self-Service Tool for Showcasing Digital Collections
Stanford University has recently enhanced Spotlight, an open source application that enables librarians, curators, and others to easily build web-based exhibits that showcase digital collections. In this project update we'll review the main features of Spotlight by demonstrating several examples of Spotlight-built exhibits and discussing the experience of the curators who built them. We'll also describe the technical requirements for adopting Spotlight, and highlight the potential for other institutions to customize and extend Spotlight's capabilities for their own needs while contributing to its growth as an open source project.

Presenters: Gary Geisler (Stanford University), Stuart Snydman (Stanford University)

Presentation 2
Beyond the Early Modern OCR Project
The Mellon Foundation grant-funded Early Modern OCR Project (eMOP) is nearing the completion of 2+ years of work at the Initiative for Digital Humanities, Media, and Culture (IDHMC). As part of our mission, the eMOP team and the IDHMC are eager to share the results of our research. We want to ensure that the tools and techniques developed by eMOP remain viable and robust into the future by spreading the word about the tools we have created and their capabilities to scholars and librarians, to encourage use, get feedback and find new partners to continue early modern OCR development.

Presenter: Matthew Christy (Texas A&M University)

Presentation 3
APRICOT: A Pedagogical Hub for Medieval Studies
The session will introduce APRICOT, a pedagogical hub for medieval and early modern studies. Designed by library-based CLIR postdoctoral fellows, the hub is intended to assist the sharing and dissemination of teaching materials, provide peer-review and metrics suitable for tenure committees and job search, and create a community of support and practice around teaching the Middle Ages. We will present the results of our environmental scan, discuss our use cases and implementation paths, and unveil our prototype site. The choice of Omeka as a platform for APRICOT will be examined. The session will culminate with a discussion of future strategies.

Presenters: Tamsyn Rose-Steel (Johns Hopkins University)
Co-Authors: Ece Turnator (University of Texas, Austin), Alexandra Bolintineanu (University of Toronto), Matthew Evan Davis (North Carolina State University)

Presentation 4
Mirador: A Cross-Repository Image Comparison and Annotation Tool
Mirador (http://projectmirador.org) is an open-source, web based, multi-window, image viewing platform with the ability to zoom, display, compare and annotate images from around the world. It is a collaborative software development effort, driven largely by institutions interested in leveraging the International Image Interoperability Framework to support comparative and interactive uses of image-based resources across libraries, museums and archives. This project update will report on the latest development progress on Mirador, as well how Mirador is being used to advance novel forms of instruction and research.

Presenters: Stuart Snydman (Stanford University), Drew Winget (Stanford University)

Presentation 5
Getting It Together! Automating Standardized Technical Metadata for Images and Audio
Effective management of digital content for long term access may depend heavily upon the availability of good technical metadata. However, the generation of this metadata in current schemas is not straightforward and may be complex. Even the testing of files for validity of format can have surprising results. At the University of Alabama, we have developed methods to automate much of this process for image and audio content, to reduce time and cost. By validating formats prior to ingest and capturing standardized technical metadata, we strive to ensure that what we are preserving can be migrated in the future.

Presenter: Jody DeRidder (University of Alabama)

Speakers
avatar for Matt Christy

Matt Christy

Associate Director for Technology and eResources, Baylor Health Sciences Library
avatar for Jody L DeRidder

Jody L DeRidder

Head, Metadata & Digital Services, University of Alabama
My focus is on leveraging available resources, energy and interests to develop collaborative and often innovative solutions to problems we all face. My background is heavily technical, but my approach is very humanistic. I'm actively seeking opportunities in which I can best contribute to the field and meeting needs/improving services.
GG

Gary Geisler

UX Designer, Stanford University DLSS
avatar for Tamsyn Rose-Steel

Tamsyn Rose-Steel

Digital Scholarship Specialist, Johns Hopkins University
avatar for Stuart Snydman

Stuart Snydman

Associate Director for Digital Strategy, Stanford University Libraries
DW

Drew Winget

Visualization Engineer, Stanford University Libraries


Tuesday October 27, 2015 9:00am - 10:30am
Salon A Pinnacle Hotel

9:00am

Fedora 4 Workshop
Fedora is a flexible, extensible repository platform for the management and dissemination of digital content. Fedora 4, the new, revitalized version of Fedora, was released into production in November of 2014. Fedora 4 features include vast improvements in scalability, linked data capabilities, research data support, modularity, ease of use and more. Both new and existing Fedora users will be interested in learning about and experiencing these new features and functionality first-hand.

This workshop will provide an introduction to and overview of Fedora 4, with a focus on the latest features. After an initial review of the most significant new features, participants will learn about best practices and community standards for modeling data in Fedora 4. Using a pre-configured virtual machine environment, attendees will participate in a hands-on session that will give them a chance to explore Fedora 4 by following step-by-step instructions. This section will demonstrate how to create and manage content in Fedora 4 in accordance with linked data best practices. Finally, participants will learn how to integrate Fedora 4 with external applications and services, including triplestores and search indices, using the well-established Apache Camel framework.

Speakers
avatar for David Wilcox

David Wilcox

Product Manager, DuraSpace
DuraSpace


Tuesday October 27, 2015 9:00am - 12:00pm
Salon F Pinnacle Hotel

10:30am

Break
Hot and cold beverages can be found outside the session rooms on the Lower Level and Levels 2 & 3.

This break is sponsored by Alexander Street Press.

Tuesday October 27, 2015 10:30am - 10:45am
2nd Level and Lower Level

10:45am

Publishing Cooperatives: A New Way to Sustain Open Access? • Automate and Integrate: Implementing Open Access Policies So They Stick
Presentation 1
Publishing Cooperatives: A New Way to Sustain Open Access?
Open access, which seeks to provide the world with free access to peer­ reviewed research and scholarship, is now achieving widespread support, from librarians, funding agencies, scholars, and, of course, readers. Turning this support into sustainable practice, however, remains a challenge. The dominant open access funding model in the sciences relies on author processing charges (APCs), which can be as high as five thousand dollars to publish a single article. In the humanities and social sciences, with their lower grant funding, APC rates pose a significant barrier to the expansion of open access.

This session proposes that we begin to investigate a new way to sustain open access, focusing initially on the social sciences and humanities, but potentially for all disciplines. To explore the feasibility of an Open Access Publishing Cooperatives calls for consulting with major stakeholders, including research libraries, societies, presses, funders, and others, to pool the expertise, resources, and finances that are already on the table to enable an open access model that does not rely on APCs. Among the ideas to be considered are how OA Publishing Cooperatives would allow libraries to gradually redirect their collection budgets away from subscriptions and APC funds toward directly supporting the publishing activities of scholarly societies and presses.

The Public Knowledge Project at Stanford and Simon Fraser University recently received MacArthur Foundation funding to conduct a two-year feasibility study of open access publishing cooperatives, to consult with stakeholders, develop the required technology, and outline the steps required to bringing the idea into production. This session will provide a description of the study, the findings to date, and engage the audience in their thoughts and feedback on the opportunities and challenges for libraries in this cooperative model for open access publishing.

Presenters: John Willinsky (Stanford University)

Presentation 2
Automate and Integrate: Implementing Open Access Policies So They Stick
This talk explores the challenges of implementing an open access policy across the University of California system and the opportunities afforded by the semi-automation of faculty participation in the policy. We will report on the social and technical work of establishing a systemwide publication management system, the local resources necessary to acclimate faculty to the policy and the tool, and the levels of faculty participation as a result of this work. We will also explore the challenges ahead—attention, disciplinary coverage, funding—and make a case for integrating OA policies into other faculty reporting systems on campus.

Presenters: Catherine Mitchell (California Digital Library), Justin Gonder (California Digital Library), Kirk Hastings (California Digital Library), Martin Brennan (University of California, Los Angeles)

Speakers
avatar for Martin Brennan

Martin Brennan

Copyright and Licensing Librarian, UCLA
avatar for Justin Gonder

Justin Gonder

Product Manager, Access & Publishing Group, California Digital Library
KH

Kirk Hastings

Senior Developer, California Digital Library
avatar for Catherine Mitchell

Catherine Mitchell

Director, Access & Publishing Group, California Digital Library, University of California
JW

John Willinsky

Khosla Family Professor of Education, Stanford University


Tuesday October 27, 2015 10:45am - 12:00pm
Ballroom I

10:45am

Two Great Tastes that Taste Great Together: A Collaborative Approach to Supporting Student-Created Digital Scholarship • The Radical and the Incremental: Expanding the Librarian's Tool Kit to Prepare the Undergraduate Digital Scholar/Citizen
Presentation 1
Two Great Tastes that Taste Great Together: A Collaborative Approach to Supporting Student-Created Digital Scholarship
Student scholarship and student-run publications are valuable to the scholarly record, representing the nascent activities of the next generation of scholars, and serving as an academic playground for new forms of digital scholarly communication. However, student scholarship is often at risk—in addition to facing many of the same business problems affecting the scholarly publishing industry, it can also fall victim to unique problems inherent in student publications. Student publications have regular, constant turnover; sometimes, they struggle to stick to a regular schedule, or secure enough quality submissions and staff to field an issue; many student publishers don't have plans for long term web presence, discoverability, distribution, or archiving; finally, for most, this is their first experience running any business, yet many don't even think of themselves as being in the publishing business.

Georgetown University's students publish in a variety of media, ranging from traditional scholarly journals, to web-based peer-reviewed journals, student-produced newsletters, newspapers, literary magazines, and more. Many of these publications come to the Library for support, whether it's digital archiving, growing subscriptions, developing marketing strategies, advice on indexing, production and editorial management, or agreement support. In order to meet the needs of this diverse community, we've developed a model of collaboration between the Library and the Press to support communication between publications, and bring complementary expertise to supporting the entire lifecycle of student publishing. So far, the fruits of this collaboration have been a student publishing fair, a new series of workshops for student publishers and editors, increased digital repository submissions and activity, and creating digital resources for student publishers on campus. Join our discussion as we explore other opportunities for collaboration across organizations to support student-created digital scholarship.

Presenter: Kate Dohe (Georgetown University)
Co-Author: Laura Leichum (Georgetown University)

Presentation 2
The Radical and the Incremental: Expanding the Librarian's Tool Kit to Prepare the Undergraduate Digital Scholar/Citizen
Librarian-faculty digital humanities collaboration is often characterized by multi-year, resource-intensive projects based on faculty research. These projects are important but far from the whole story. Faculty uninterested in using technology in their own research may welcome it in the undergraduate classroom; especially when it enables assignments that help undergraduate students engage with course material. Recently, tools have emerged that lower the barrier to entry for digital projects and digital methods have become more widespread among a number of disciplines.

The use of digital methods in undergraduate courses can take many forms, from simple blogging to a full -semester course in digital humanities or multimedia methods. Whatever form digital scholarship engagement takes in the undergraduate classroom, librarians can be valuable partners because of their commitment to developing value-driven research skills and their connections to library collections, technology and expertise. However, in order for libraries to productively engage with new digital approaches and assignments, librarians need to rethink their relationship to their organization's technology infrastructure and staff.

This panel will focus on three approaches to integrating digital scholarship into the undergraduate curriculum. UNC developed a summer workshop series to offer cross training in digital methods to subject librarians. At Columbia, several humanities courses have integrated a "digital lab" component created and taught by librarians resulting in student digital projects. At Haverford College, a summer workshop in digital methods for subject librarians is paired with a toolkit for digital scholarship methods and some technical tools for lightweight projects. Though the approaches to undergraduate digital scholarship programs differ between these institutions, there are several common threads: a need for flexible technology approaches in terms of both infrastructure and staffing and a need to integrate digital scholarship into the work of subject librarians who liaise with faculty and students.

Presenters: Barbara Rockenbach (Columbia University), Laurie Allen (Haverford College), Stewart Varner (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)

Speakers
avatar for Laurie Allen

Laurie Allen

Assistant Director for Digital Scholarship, University of Pennsylvania Libraries
University of Pennsylvania
avatar for Kate Dohe

Kate Dohe

Digital Services Librarian, Georgetown University
BR

Barbara Rockenbach

Director, Humanities & History Libraries, Columbia University
avatar for Stewart Varner

Stewart Varner

Managing Director, Price Lab for Digital Huamanities, University of Pennsylvania
UNC Chapell Hill Libraries


Tuesday October 27, 2015 10:45am - 12:00pm
Ballroom II & III

10:45am

Linked Data at NYPL—Building a Public Works Infrastructure • Dataset Optimization in IRs • Navigating the Born-Digital Archive Wilderness...
Presentation 1
Linked Data at NYPL — Building a Public Works Infrastructure
NYPL Labs is creating a linked data layer to connect our many discrete systems and to enable additional or nontraditional description from our staff, our public, legacy indexes, algorithmically-generated metadata, and more. By providing a URI for every collection and item in our Research Libraries, extracting, enhancing and storing only necessary access points from existing records, and building a framework for descriptive contributions from staff and users, we hope to support new symbiotic discovery experiences for our public and powered by our staff and public.

Presenters: Shawn Averkamp (New York Public Library), Matt Miller (New York Public Library)

Presentation 2
Dataset Optimization in Institutional Repositories
Data wants to be free. In the movement toward Open Data, simply posting a dataset online is not enough; data must be optimized for discovery, reuse, and citation. In this project update, librarians at Montana State University will present results from an analysis of data archiving practices in a variety of data repositories, including institutional repositories (IRs) and private data repositories. These results will be synthesized into a set of recommendations for optimizing data in IRs. Attendees will leave the session with an idea of how to enhance discoverability, reusability, and citeability of data in their IRs.

Presenter: Sara Mannheimer (Montana State University)
Co-author: Leila Sterman (Montana State University), Susan Borda (Montana State University

Presentation 3
Navigating the Born-Digital Archive Wilderness - The Ford International Fellowships Program Archive
Institutional archives are now all born-digital, and the implications of this for libraries who collect these archives are enormous. Columbia has tackled this challenge with a $1 million grant from the Ford Foundation, which enabled us to build a repository and access system for their International Fellowships Program, to be used by researchers and practitioners from the NGO / philanthropic community. Our project update will provide insight into how to acquire, accession, preserve and make accessible a large-scale born-digital archive. It will also describe the new Fedora/Hydra/Blacklight development Columbia has done to provide an effective access environment for this content.

Presenters: Stephen Davis (Columbia University), Benjamin Armintor (Columbia University)

Speakers
BA

Benjamin Armintor

Lead Programmer/Analyst, Columbia University Libraries
SA

Shawn Averkamp

Manager, Metadata Services, NYPL Labs, New York Public Library
SD

Stephen Davis

Director, Libraries Digital Program, Columbia University Libraries
avatar for Sara Mannheimer

Sara Mannheimer

Data Management Librarian, Montana State University
Montana State University
MM

Matt Miller

Head of Semantic Applications, NYPL Labs, New York Public Library


Tuesday October 27, 2015 10:45am - 12:00pm
Salon A Pinnacle Hotel

12:00pm

Lunch
Buffet lunch will be available on three levels:
2nd Level: Ballroom and Port of Vancouver
Lobby Level: Tuscany
Lower Level: Salon A

If you are attending a lunch session or workshop (in Salon C, D, E, or F), please proceed to the Lower Level, grab a lunch, and head into one of the session rooms.

Tuesday October 27, 2015 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Foyer and Ballroom (2nd Level), Tuscany, Lower Level (Salon A)

12:15pm

Collaboration Tools and Workflow Tracking Solutions in Digital Initiatives
Limited Capacity filling up

Following up on the last year's "<a href="http://www.diglib.org/forums/2014forum/program/02z/">Using Confluence & JIRA for Project Management</a>," this session will be a Birds of a Feather discussion on continuing developments integrating Confluence and JIRA or other collaboration tools and workflow tracking solutions in digital initiatives and development. It will be an opportunity to meet with other members of the community, share experiences and demos. This BoF seeks to promote interaction among institutions using these tools, and build upon best practices.

Speakers
MC

Matt Critchlow

Manager of Development and Web Services, UC San Diego Library
avatar for Cristela Garcia-Spitz

Cristela Garcia-Spitz

Digital Library Development Project Manager, ClimateQUAL Implementation Team Co-Chair, UC San Diego Library
UCSD
avatar for Elizabeth McAulay

Elizabeth McAulay

Head, Digital Library Program, UCLA
McAulay has worked in the UCLA Digital Library Program for several years as the Librarian for Digital Collection Development and now serving as Interim Head. The UCLA Digital Library Program pursues and publishes digital projects that have international impact.
avatar for Astrid J. Smith

Astrid J. Smith

Rare Book and Special Collections Digitization Specialist, Stanford University Libraries
As Rare Book and Special Collections Digitization Specialist with Stanford University Libraries’ Digital Production Group (DPG), I create high quality images of such things as the rare “gems of the collection” books, and various materials from our library’s archives. In this role, I manage a steady flow of digitization requests from faculty, staff, and other branch libraries, as part of our mission to support teaching and scholarly... Read More →
avatar for Daniel Zellner

Daniel Zellner

Production Coordinator, Northwestern University Library
Digitization Standards and Worfklows, GoldenThread, FADGI


Tuesday October 27, 2015 12:15pm - 1:20pm
Salon D

12:15pm

Digital Collections as Data: Re-packaging, Re-mixing, and Sharing Collections for New Forms of Scholarship
Limited Capacity full

Data analysis tools and techniques continue to evolve and become more common in humanities research. Methods range from word counts and term frequency visualization to more sophisticated processes such as topic modeling, named-entity recognition, and network analysis. Unfortunately, finding usable data can be challenging for researchers. Over the past two decades libraries have digitized, described, and provided online access to unique collections, yet these efforts don't always meet the needs of digital humanists and other computationally-inclined scholars. For example, interface development for text collections typically feature page turners rather than bulk download features and usually provide page images instead of plain text. Where bulk downloads are available, the data and metadata are often not formatted for common analytical techniques.

As a result, researchers who are not already skilled at manipulating data end up performing hours of tedious work to prepare data for analysis. And once that work is done, there isn't an easy way to share resulting data sets with other researchers. Additionally, for instructors who want to train students in digital methods, considerable data preparation can be a barrier to instruction. By providing simple methods of access to humanities data collections, libraries will be better positioned not only to support the research and pedagogical needs of both novice and advanced humanities data users but also to ensure continued use of library collections.

During this session participants will focus on gathering collection use cases, examples of approaches to collection repackaging and re-documentation, methods of dissemination (Github, Fedora, etc.), methods of evaluating re-use, and possibilities for collaborative Humanities data provision.

Presenters: Thomas Padilla (Michigan State University), Stewart Varner (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), Laurie Allen (Haverford College), Patricia Hswe (Penn State University), Sarah Potvin (Texas A&M University), Elizabeth Russey Roke (Emory University), John Russell (University of Oregon)
Co-author: Zach Coble (New York University) 

Speakers
avatar for Laurie Allen

Laurie Allen

Assistant Director for Digital Scholarship, University of Pennsylvania Libraries
University of Pennsylvania
avatar for Patricia Hswe

Patricia Hswe

Digital Content Strategist, Penn State University Libraries
In addition to my role as Digital Content Strategist, I lead user services for ScholarSphere, Penn State's repository service. I also co-direct the department of Publishing and Curation Services, a digital scholarship department launched in 2012 to provide a framework to help researchers put into practice a lifecycle management approach to the enterprise of scholarly inquiry. | | Talk with me about digital scholarship, digital humanities... Read More →
avatar for Thomas Padilla

Thomas Padilla

Digital Scholarship Librarian, Michigan State University
Thomas Padilla is Digital Scholarship Librarian at Michigan State University Libraries. In this role Thomas develops and promotes data collections to Humanists, teaches on Digital Humanities methods and tools, and engages scholars across disciplines on data curation and research data management needs. Prior to his move to Michigan he was at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign working at the Scholarly Commons and the Preservation Unit... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Potvin

Sarah Potvin

Digital Scholarship Librarian, Texas A&M University Libraries
Sarah Potvin is the Digital Scholarship Librarian in the Office of Scholarly Communication in the Texas A&M University Libraries. A co-founder of the dh+lib project and co-convener of the new ADHO digital humanities and libraries SIG, she is interested in the ways that libraries and librarians encounter and advance digital humanities. This year, she is particularly interested in talking about digital asset management systems, geospatial... Read More →
ER

Elizabeth Russey Roke

Digital Archivist, Emory University
avatar for John Russell

John Russell

Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of Oregon
avatar for Stewart Varner

Stewart Varner

Managing Director, Price Lab for Digital Huamanities, University of Pennsylvania
UNC Chapell Hill Libraries


Tuesday October 27, 2015 12:15pm - 1:20pm
Salon F Pinnacle Hotel

12:15pm

Digital Library Assessment Lunch
Limited Capacity seats available

The DLF Assessment Working Group will host an assessment-themed lunch, which will build on their presentation, Collaborative Efforts to Develop Best Practices in Assessment: A Progress Report, (Monday, October 26th, 1:30-2:30). The lunch will include facilitated discussions among attendees and coordinators of each working group, including citations, analytics, cost assessment, and user studies. Discussions will focus on determining the next steps for working groups, identifying areas for new working groups, and connecting new participants with preferred working groups.


Speakers
MB

Molly Bragg

Digital Collections Program Manager, Duke University Libraries
Duke University
avatar for Joyce Chapman

Joyce Chapman

Assessment Coordinator, Duke University Libraries
avatar for Jody L DeRidder

Jody L DeRidder

Head, Metadata & Digital Services, University of Alabama
My focus is on leveraging available resources, energy and interests to develop collaborative and often innovative solutions to problems we all face. My background is heavily technical, but my approach is very humanistic. I'm actively seeking opportunities in which I can best contribute to the field and meeting needs/improving services.
avatar for Elizabeth Kelly

Elizabeth Kelly

Digital Initiatives Librarian, Loyola University New Orleans
Loyola University New Orleans
ST

Santi Thompson

Head of Digital Repository Services, University of Houston Libraries
University of Houston


Tuesday October 27, 2015 12:15pm - 1:20pm
Salon E Pinnacle Hotel

12:30pm

The HathiTrust Research Center’s Tools for Text Analysis with Digitized Text from the HathiTrust Digital Library
Limited Capacity full

The HathiTrust Research Center (HTRC) provides research support for the growing corpus of over fourteen million volumes in the HathiTrust Digital Library (HTDL) through a suite of tools text analysis. The size of the HTDL affords scholars the opportunity to increase the scale of their inquiry and to ask new kinds of research questions. The HTRC tools create avenues for scholars to pursue these new modes of research by allowing for “non-consumptive” text analysis with the HTDL corpus. Through demonstrations, hands-on exercises, and discussion, workshop attendees will learn about the suite of HTRC tools and how they can be used to support research and teaching.

Attendees will come away with an understanding of:
  • HTRC tools that allow researchers to build custom subcollections of items from the HTDL, run HTRC-provided, off-the-shelf algorithms against them, and interpret the results;
  • HathiTrust+Bookworm, an interactive visualization for studying lexical trends within material from the HTDL; and
  • the Extracted Features (EF) Dataset, which provides page-level metadata and data derived from the items in a subcollection that a researcher can download and analyze on his or her own computer.
The workshop will present scenarios and example use cases in which HTRC tools shine, and will demonstrate the ways in which they can complement each other. Attendees will learn new strategies and approaches for the complex research questions that digitized text corpora are uniquely poised to help answer across academic disciplines.

Speakers
SB

Sayan Bhattacharyya

CLIR Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Eleanor Dickson

Eleanor Dickson

HTRC Digital Humanities Specialist, University of Illinois
HathiTrust Research Center, text analysis, #dlfteach, digital library pedagogy


Tuesday October 27, 2015 12:30pm - 2:30pm
Salon C

1:30pm

From the Laptop to the Archive: Managing Research Data in the Humanities • Exploring Open Review in the Digital Scholarship Community with Web Annotation
Presentation 1
From the Laptop to the Archive: Managing Research Data in the Humanities
Researchers, librarians, cultural heritage managers, and the general public increasingly interact with digital materials. However, no technology infrastructure currently exists that addresses the diverse needs of these groups. Our project addresses these challenges which include: converting digitized and physical materials into a usable database with appropriate metadata, providing appropriate access to different research materials for different audiences (researchers, students, public), and lack of librarian input early in the process on how research archives are best organized and preserved.

We are using Bibliopedia, a web-based platform (bibliopedia.org) that supports the organization, visualization, search, and sharing of digital archives without the need for research expertise in metadata, data visualization, or databases. Bibliopedia transforms an often unstructured mass of files into networks that can be visualized to provide new insights into structure and context. It is also a platform for active research and a gateway to long-term preservation.

We are building on the existing implementation of Bibliopedia and significantly extend its functionality to meet the needs of two different digital humanities projects:

The Chinese Railroad Workers in North America Project (chineserailroadworkers.stanford.edu), a major international research collaboration that involves over a hundred scholars from the United States, China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Canada, which needs to describe and share a large number of under-described artifacts; and

The Market Street Chinatown Archaeology Project (marketsteet.stanford.edu), a collaborative, community-based research and education program established to study a remarkable collection of artifacts from the first Chinese immigrant community that lived in San Jose, California. This project seeks to integrate its diverse collections to enable new research insights and to share materials for teaching.

In this panel, we will discuss Bibliopedia and our experiences using and adapting it for these projects, both of which continue to add to their wide arrays of digital and digitized historical materials.

Presenters: Claudia Engel (Stanford University), Mike Widner (Stanford University), Jason Heppler (Stanford University)

Presentation 2
Exploring Open Review in the Digital Scholarship Community with Web Annotation
Scientific publications have been recent leaders in exploring new forms of peer review: PLoS ONE and PubMed Commons are two well-known examples of a broader trend toward post-publication review. More recently, we have seen examples of new models of peer review in the humanities, including Kathleen Fitzpatrick's monograph Planned Obsolescence (published by NYU Press in 2011), which was openly peer reviewed at MediaCommons Press in fall 2009; the draft version remains available online for open discussion. In recent years, the digital humanities (DH) has established a significant presence on the web; digital humanists tweet and blog prolifically, and many of these scholars rely on aggregators such as dh + lib and DHNow to find out about new content. To this end, we will discuss the potential for leveraging the existing robustness of the digital scholarship and DH communities for these new models of peer review.

Michigan Publishing has a history in experimental forms of publishing, as well. In 2011, the U-M Press published the open access version of Hacking the Academy, edited by Daniel J. Cohen and Tom Scheinfeldt; this edited volume "crowdsourced" its submissions in one week through a call for proposals online and on social media. Michigan Publishing has also recently implemented open peer review for an upcoming monograph using the Hypothes.is web annotation tool. The panel will discuss Michigan's exploration in this area and offer suggestions for future work.

The Hypothes.is project, funded by the Knight, Mellon, Sloan, Shuttleworth, and Helmsley foundations, is based on the Annotator project and W3C annotation standards currently under development. We will discuss the roadmap for Hypothes.is—what features have been implemented and which are yet to come, and how this and other tools might be used to drive forward the new models suggested by the panel.

Presenters: Jason Colman (University of Michigan), Alix Keener (University of Michigan)

Speakers
avatar for Jason Colman

Jason Colman

Director of Publishing Services, University of Michigan Library
CE

Claudia Engel

Academic Technology Specialist, stanford university
avatar for Jason Heppler

Jason Heppler

Academic Technology Specialist, Stanford University
Historian of 20th c. America, using R as part of computational and spatial historical analysis and data visualization.
avatar for Alix Keener

Alix Keener

Digital Scholarship Librarian, University of Michigan
University of Michigan
avatar for Michael Widner

Michael Widner

Academic Technology Specialist, Stanford University Libraries


Tuesday October 27, 2015 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Salon A Pinnacle Hotel

1:30pm

Making the Migration, Moving Legacy Collections into Hydra • Exploring Motivations and Evaluation Techniques for DAMS Migration
Presentation 1
Making the Migration, Moving Legacy Collections into Hydra
In an effort to reach a more sustainable technology landscape and provide better access to our users, Cornell University Library has undertaken a large initiative to aggregate many of our digital collections into a Hydra environment. As a first step we are tackling migration of our text-based collections, which currently reside in DLXS (a legacy system developed by University of Michigan). Since Cornell is also a HathiTrust partner, we initially evaluated collections in terms of their viability for deposit into HathiTrust, with the hope of integrating the two systems. We were excited at the prospect of leveraging Hathi's excellent preservation infrastructure and shared cost model for storage, while allowing for customization of the user interface through Blacklight. However, what seemed conceptually simple at the outset quickly grew in complexity, given that the collections created in DLXS were not tailored toward large, inter-institutional repositories like HathiTrust. The collections required significant "retrofitting" to be deposit-ready, and the skillsets of the assembled project team were not sufficient to do this work. We revised our goals: the remaining items would be pushed into Hydra, with the understanding that given the right combinations of skills, a future effort could be mounted to deposit these additionally into HathiTrust.

In our presentation we will discuss the variables that have informed our decisions (including a checklist developed to evaluate legacy collections for HathiTrust ingest), as well our workflow for moving collections into Hydra. We will also discuss our unified SOLR index, which we intend to use across all of the digital collections slated for Hydra. Lastly, we will identify the types of skills (and ultimately, staff) required to bring this effort to fruition, and our plans for moving forward.

Presenters: Danielle Mericle (Cornell University), Steven Folsom (Cornell University), Michelle Paolillo (Cornell University)

Presentations 2 & 3 - Overview
Exploring Motivations and Evaluation Techniques for DAMS Migration
In recent years, cultural heritage organizations (CHOs) have begun re-assessing Digital Asset Management Systems (DAMS) based on the changing needs of users, the expanding skill sets of staff, and the proliferation of web-based content management tools. As CHOs engage in this process, some choose to migrate from one DAMS to another. This panel will focus on the process of DAMS migration from several perspectives. The first presentation draws upon survey results to understand why CHOs are choosing to migrate from one DAMS to another. The second presentation uses a case study to demonstrate how one CHO selected a new DAMS and is implementing a migration strategy.

Presentation 2
Motivations for DAMS Migration

Based on results from "Identifying Motivations for DAMS Migration: A Survey," this presentation will discuss themes and features desired in future DAMS. It outlines specific topical areas that will inform future system and workflow development and governing body/vendor relations. Presenters will conclude by reviewing lessons learned from the project as well as discussing future areas of research related to this study.

Presenters: Santi Thompson (University of Houston), Ayla Stein (University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign)

Presentation 3
Selection Methods and DAMS Migration Implementation

In the Summer of 2014, the University of Houston Libraries formed the DAMS Task Force to identify a system that can support the growing expectations of the UH Digital Library. This presentation will focus on the two core activities that the task force completed: needs assessment and DAMS evaluation. The presentation will discuss how task force members compiled the results of the assessment, established DAMS evaluation criteria, and used the approach to select a new DAMS. It will also reflect on the important role that collaboration, project management, and strategic planning played in this team-based approach to DAMS selection.

Presenters: Annie Wu (University of Houston), Andrew Weidner (University of Houston)

Speakers
DM

Danielle Mericle

Director, Digital Media Group, Cornell University Library
avatar for Michelle Paolillo

Michelle Paolillo

Digital Curation Services Lead, Cornell University
Michelle is Cornell University's Library's Lead for Digital Curation Services. She is invested in the practical logistics of digital preservation (harmonizing workflows, preservation storage, interoperability, systems design, etc.). She also has duties related to digital humanities, especially in support of computational analysis of text, so OCR quality and computational method are also part of her focus.
avatar for Ayla Stein

Ayla Stein

Metadata Librarian, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
ST

Santi Thompson

Head of Digital Repository Services, University of Houston Libraries
University of Houston
avatar for Andrew Weidner

Andrew Weidner

Metadata Services Coordinator, University of Houston Libraries
AW

Annie Wu

Head of Metadata and Digitization Services, University of Houston Libraries


Tuesday October 27, 2015 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Ballroom II & III

1:30pm

Take Back the Archive • College Women: A Collaborative Cross-Institutional Archives Portal • Connecting Users and IRs: Personal Archiving via Zotero
Presentation 1
Take Back the Archive
Drawing on research by Sadler and Bourg (2013), Olsen (2002; 2007), Reucker et. al. (2011) and others, this project update demonstrates working solutions for "rich prospect" and "generous" interfaces that also consider respectful representations of survivors of sexual violence. Imperative to the success of our project is the need to attend to the collection and presentation of our materials in ways that advocate for rape survivors and challenge a community of complacency and ignorance.

Presenters: Purdom Linblad (University of Virginia)
Co-author: Jeremy Boggs (University of Virginia)

Presentation 2
College Women: A Collaborative Cross-Institutional Archives Portal

Institutions are collaborating in order to pool resources as well as create new ways to discover collections through innovative digital scholarship projects. The College Women: Documenting the History of Women In Higher Education project brings together the extensive collections of letters, diaries, and scrapbooks created by students at the "Seven Sisters" colleges in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and now held by Barnard, Bryn Mawr, Mount Holyoke, Smith, Vassar, and Wellesley Colleges, and the Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard. Our project update will examine our one-year pilot project process as well as next steps.

Presenters: Rachel Appel (Bryn Mawr College), Joanna DiPasquale (Vassar College), Monica Mercado (Bryn Mawr College)

Presentation 3
Connecting Users and IRs: Personal Archiving via Zotero

This project update shares forthcoming Zotero enhancements that will allow users to connect with their institutional repository (IR) and self-archive materials from within the Zotero interface. This functionality is currently being tested at Penn State University, and will be open source and available to other institutions employing Hydra-based IRs. The project is aimed towards bringing self-archiving into the user's personal workflow, as well as connecting the local IR with citation management software.

Presenters: Ellysa Cahoy (Penn State University), Smiljana Antonijevic (Penn State University), Dawn Childress (University of California, Los Angeles)

Speakers
avatar for Smiljana Antonijevic

Smiljana Antonijevic

Research Anthropologist, Penn State University, United States of America
I explore the intersection of communication, culture, and technology through research and teaching in the U.S. and Europe. Recent publications include my forthcoming book, Amongst Digital Humanists (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015); Personal Library Curation (The John Hopkins University Press, 2014); Working in Virtual Knowledge, (MIT Press, 2013); The Immersive Hand (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013); Cultures of Formalization (Palgrave Macmillan,2012). I... Read More →
avatar for Rachel Appel

Rachel Appel

Digital Projects and Services Librarian, Temple University
avatar for Ellysa Cahoy

Ellysa Cahoy

Education Librarian, Penn State University
DC

Dawn Childress

Librarian, Digital Collections & Scholarship, UCLA Digital Library Program
avatar for Joanna DiPasquale

Joanna DiPasquale

Head of Digital Scholarship & Technology Services, Vassar College Libraries
PL

Purdom Lindblad

Head of Graduate Programs, Scholars' Lab, University of Virginia Libraries
avatar for Monica Mercado

Monica Mercado

CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow and Director of The Albert M. Greenfield Digital Center for the History of Women's Education, Bryn Mawr College
women's history, digital collections, and archives pedagogy


Tuesday October 27, 2015 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Ballroom I

2:30pm

Break
Snacks can be found outside the session rooms on the Lower Level and Levels 2 & 3.

Tuesday October 27, 2015 2:30pm - 2:45pm
2nd Level and Lower Level

2:45pm

Archivematica as a Service: a Cloud-based, Consortial Approach to Digital Preservation • Mind the Gap. Bridging Digital Libraries & Archives
Presentation 1
Archivematica as a Service: a Cloud-based, Consortial Approach to Digital Preservation
The Council of Prairie and Pacific University Libraries (COPPUL) is piloting a cloud-based preservation service to its members using the Archivematica digital preservation system. The service is offered to COPPUL member institutions that wish to preserve digital holdings but find a hosted option preferable to installing and managing local Archivematica instances. This service is a joint effort of COPPUL, Artefactual Systems (Archivematica lead developers), and University of British Columbia (UBC) Library (the cloud storage provider). COPPUL is responsible for promoting the service, managing the partnership among COPPUL members, and seeding the one-time set-up costs. Artefactual Systems provides account administration, installation, server administration, and user technical support. UBC Library provides fee-based server hosting and digital object storage service. Our presentation will cover the service model generally, including infrastructure and governance, as well as the experience of the service users and providers to date. We will also discuss future directions and challenges and consider how other consortia may apply this model.

Presenters: Bronwen Sprout (University of British Columbia), Lisa Goddard (University of Victoria), Sarah Romkey (Artefactual Systems), Daniel Sifton (Vancouver Island University)

Presentation 2
Mind the Gap. Bridging Digital Libraries & Archives
The overarching goal of digital libraries and archives are similar - to foster the preservation of cultural assets, published or otherwise. Despite this common goal, the different tools, terminology, and approaches of libraries and archives can prevent librarians and archivists from collaborating. This presentation will highlight features of the open source Islandora framework that can help bridge the gap between digital libraries and archives, leveraging the strengths of both fields of expertise. The resulting rich ecosystem can provide an empowering approach to building user-centric collections that also achieve the goals of long term preservation.

The OAIS reference model creates a common thread for discourse, especially with the increasing adoption of the model in both communities. The model will be discussed in relation to its application for digital libraries and archives, including non-traditional areas such as research data management. Also, new tools are emerging to bring digital libraries and archives even closer together. The tools highlighted in this presentation will include 1) the Manuscript Solution Pack (facilitating the viewing of a high resolution image of a manuscript, TEI and EAD description), 2) Drexel EAD modules (facilitates ingest and display of EAD and child object), and 3) Archidora (an integration between Islandora and Archivematica), 4) Disk Image and WARC Solution Packs. Additional preservation features of the environment will be discussed, especially those that demonstrate the intersection with library and archival workflows.

The presentation will encourage leveraging existing knowledge bases and ecosystems for libraries and archives, working with the strengths of each, including standards, policies, workflows, and applications. Doing so will spur new developments that benefit both digital libraries and archives.

Presenter: Mark Leggott (University of PEI / Islandora Foundation)

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Goddard

Lisa Goddard

AUL Digital Scholarship and Strategy, University of Victoria
avatar for Mark Leggott

Mark Leggott

President, discoverygarden Inc.
Mark is the University Librarian at the University of PEI, President of discoverygarden Inc. and founder of the open source Islandora project. Mark has been involved with things open and digital for most of his career, and together with the team at the University of PEI is working on a digital archive of the complete cultural and heritage history of the Island. As founder of the Islandora project Mark collaborates with global institutions... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Romkey

Sarah Romkey

Systems Archivist, Artefactual Systems Inc.
Systems Archivist for Archivematica, AtoM and ArchivesDirect.
avatar for Daniel Sifton

Daniel Sifton

Coordinator, Library Automation + Tech Services, Vancouver Island University
Vancouver Island University, Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada
BS

Bronwen Sprout

Head, Digital Programs and Services, UBC Library


Tuesday October 27, 2015 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Salon A Pinnacle Hotel

2:45pm

APTrust: One Year into Production • Hydra in a Box • Fedora 4 Update
Presentation 1
APTrust: One Year into Production
APTrust, a consortium of 17 members dedicated to digital stewardship at scale, launched in October 2014. This presentation will provide insight into the core challenges that both the APTrust administration and our members deal with one year later into production as well as on an ongoing basis. In particular, we will explore what has changed with the way we operate—from business models, governance, to TDR certification. There will also be a production update—including a brief technical overview. Please bring your questions, insights, and ideas!

Presenters: Chip German (University of Virginia), Laura Capell (University of Miami), Elisabeth Long (University of Chicago), Andrew Diamond (APTrust)

Slides: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1uCw9Vvwa-j6p9toMOhDZdL837xjsUJh-TJyW0F-vZWw/edit#slide=id.p4

Presentation 2
Hydra in a Box
The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) is partnering with Stanford University and DuraSpace on "Hydra in a Box": a next-generation repository solution that extends the existing Hydra project codebase and its vibrant and growing community to build, bundle, and promote a feature-rich, robust, flexible digital repository. This solution takes advantage of current web environments, user expectations, and curation needs for rich digital objects, offering best of breed technologies and methods that match new and emerging requirements for content management. The presentation provides a project update and details the envisioned project outcomes.

Presenters: Mark Matienzo (Digital Public Library of America), Tom Cramer (Stanford University), Jonathan Markow (DuraSpace)

Presentation 3
Fedora 4 Update
Since its production release in November of 2014, Fedora 4 has seen a number of important developments, both in terms of the technical features and the Fedora community. This project update will review these developments, including a new model for community-driven feature development, pilot projects and tools for Fedora 3 to 4 migrations, and a model for community support and governance. Attendees will also learn how to engage with the Fedora community and participate in new developments.

Presenter: David Wilcox (DuraSpace)

Speakers
avatar for Tom Cramer

Tom Cramer

Assistant University Librarian & Director for Digital Library Systems & Services, Stanford University
Hydra, Hydra-in-a-Box, Blacklight, Fedora, IIIF, Web Archiving, Linked Data, geospatial services, open source, community.
avatar for Chip German

Chip German

Program Director, Academic Preservation Trust, University of Virginia
APTrust, University of Virginia Library
avatar for Elisabeth Long

Elisabeth Long

Associate University Librarian for Digital Service, University of Chicago
avatar for Mark Matienzo

Mark Matienzo

Director of Technology, Digital Public Library of America
Mark A. Matienzo is the Director of Technology for DPLA. As Director of Technology, Mark is responsible for the overall technology vision for the DPLA and overseeing its implementation. Mark also serves as the primary technical contact for outside organizations, partners, and developers. Prior to joining DPLA, Mark worked as an archivist and technologist specializing in born-digital materials and metadata management, at institutions including the... Read More →
avatar for David Wilcox

David Wilcox

Product Manager, DuraSpace
DuraSpace


Tuesday October 27, 2015 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Ballroom I

2:45pm

6 Snapshots - Open Access/Data Management
Opening the Archive: Open Access at the Harry Ransom Center
The Harry Ransom Center is among the nation's finest research libraries; its extensive holdings provide a unique record of the creative processes of thousands of writers and artists. In 2015, the Center launched its open access policy, removing permission and use fees for its online collections believed to be in the public domain. Accompanying the release of the policy, the Center launched Project REVEAL, making available 22,000 pages of manuscript content of some of the best-known names from American and English literature to be used for any purpose without restriction. This update will focus on the Center's open access initiatives.

Presenter: Elizabeth Gushee (Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin)

Increasing Openness and Connections throughout the Scientific Workflow
We can improve scientific communication to increase efficiency in the accumulation of knowledge. One way to do this is through practical change; science will benefit from improving technologies to document and connect the entire lifecycle of research projects. This presentation will focus on the practical aspects, illustrated through the efficiencies gained via the Open Science Framework and its add-on connections to Dataverse and Figshare. The presentation will specifically talk about how research support teams (ie. data librarians, repository managers, and others) can utilize these tools to help their users improve daily workflows.

Presenters: Dan Valen (Figshare), Elizabeth Quigley (Harvard Institute for Quantitative Social Science)

Open Access Institutional Repositories and Social Justice: What Kind of Impact Are We Having?
Open access institutional repositories have the potential to be tangible expressions of the missions of academic institutions to work for social justice and make a difference in the world. Reference to such missions is a common selling point to secure funding or deposit materials in a repository, but is not always an on-going measurement in assessment for repositories. This presentation describes how to conduct such assessment and understand how repositories impact social justice projects.

Presenters: Margaret Heller (Loyola University Chicago), Franny Gaede (Butler University)

Self-deposit of Geospatial Scientific Data
Sharing scientific data is increasingly valuable for reproducible science, furthering investigation, and innovation. To this end, repositories facilitate data sharing by making scholarly data available. We are at an impasse, however. Librarian-mediated approaches to self-deposit of scientific data are very resource-intensive, and the repository services provided to researchers are often limited. Self-deposit is quite a challenging use case as it encompasses data preparation, metadata description, upload, visualization, annotation, sharing, publication, access, rights, preservation, citation, and discovery services. This editorial suggests we revisit the value proposition we make for self-deposit and mitigate its resource-intensive nature.

Presenter: Darren Hardy (Stanford University)

It's All About Communication: Implementing ORCiD iDs at a Large Research University
How do you implement and advocate for researcher identifiers (specifically, ORCID iDs) for all faculty at a large research institution? How does such an implementation fit in with a research library's research data initiatives? This presentation will cover best practices for integrating ORCID iDs in campus systems like Pure and the institutional repository, as well as dealing with diverse campus stakeholders, researcher fears, and thorny issues around surveillance concerns and "tracking".

Presenter: Alix Keener (University of Michigan)

Digital Preservation and Data Repositories: Just what does "long-term" mean, anyway?
As the University of Washington Libraries began writing policy for the institution's data repository currently under development, we found ourselves in a quandary: "how long is long enough?" Within the framework mandated by the US Government's Office of Science and Technology Policy's (OSTP) memo on access to federally funded research, and given the myriad challenges of digital preservation, what are libraries committing to when planning a repository to provide long-term access to research data? This snapshot will stir conversation on a topic that needs to be addressed within a community jumping head first into the development of institutional data repositories.

Presenters: Mahria Lebow (University of Washington), Moriah Neils (University of Washington)

Speakers
avatar for Franny Gaede

Franny Gaede

Scholarly Communication Librarian, Butler University
avatar for Elizabeth Gushee

Elizabeth Gushee

Head, Digital Collections, Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin
avatar for Darren Hardy

Darren Hardy

GIS Software Engineer, Stanford University
avatar for Margaret Heller

Margaret Heller

Digital Services Librarian, Loyola University Chicago Libraries
Loyola University Chicago
avatar for Alix Keener

Alix Keener

Digital Scholarship Librarian, University of Michigan
University of Michigan
ML

Mahria Lebow

Data Repository Librarian, University of Washington
MN

Moriah Neils

Preservation Librarian, University of Washington Libraries
EQ

Elizabeth Quigley

User Experience Lead, IQSS at Harvard
avatar for Dan Valen

Dan Valen

Product Specialist, Figshare
Dan joined figshare in early 2014 as its first US-based employee. As a product specialist, he focuses on the development of figshare in North America through community engagement, marketing and promotion, strategic partnerships, and educational outreach. Dan helps provide a lateral perspective across the research data management landscape in assessing the needs of researchers and institutions alike, while also offering guidance on current... Read More →


Tuesday October 27, 2015 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Ballroom II & III

2:45pm

Building and Managing Social Media Collections
Limited Capacity filling up

As venues for discourse and creation, social media platforms such as Twitter and Instagram are important source material for scholarly research. Future access to social media data will allow researchers to develop historical assessments based on materials representing the voices of a large and diverse set of participants. Much of this critical and ephemeral content may be lost if cultural heritage institutions are not collecting and preserving it, yet creating and managing these collections presents challenges around collecting mechanisms, curation, legal and ethical issues, and preservation.

This workshop will include the following components:

• A review of technical tools for collecting and guidelines for selecting an approach that works best for your institution and users
• A guided discussion of ethical and legal considerations in taking on this work and parallels with established archival practices
• A review of some existing use cases of libraries' social media data collecting followed by a group discussion of possible community-specific use cases and needs for supporting services.
• A demonstration of possible archival collecting workflows using NCSU Libraries' Social Media Combine collecting system (which includes NCSU Libraries' lentil system for Instagram harvesting and George Washington University's Social Feed Manager for Twitter harvesting). Participants who wish to follow along with their own instance may install it ahead of time.

Participants will leave with an awareness of the major components of a new social media collecting program, including available tools, research use cases, ethical and legal considerations, supporting resources, as well as a better understanding of how to integrate social media into existing practices and workflows. There will be opportunities to share collecting ideas with each other at the end of the workshop.

Speakers
avatar for Jason Casden

Jason Casden

Interim Associate Head, Digital Library Initiatives, NCSU Libraries
avatar for Laura Wrubel

Laura Wrubel

Software Development Librarian, George Washington University


Tuesday October 27, 2015 2:45pm - 4:45pm
Salon D

3:45pm

Break
Tuesday October 27, 2015 3:45pm - 4:00pm
2nd Level and Lower Level

4:00pm

More than Metadata: Where the rubber meets the road in DLS migration • Efficient, Scalable Integration of EML Metadata within a DSpace Repository
Presentation 1
More than Metadata: Where the Rubber Meets the Road in DLS Migration
So you've gone through the long and arduous process of selecting a new digital library system, implementing the technology, and now it sits waiting to receive your collections. Where do you start? 

This working session covers several use cases that detail the complexity of large-scale digital library system (DLS) migration from the perspective of three university libraries and a statewide academic library services consortium. Each will describe the methodologies developed at the beginning of their migration process, the unique challenges that arose along the way, how issues were managed, and the outcomes of their work.

Florida Atlantic University, Florida International University, and the University of Central Florida are members of the state's academic library services consortium, the Florida Virtual Campus (FLVC). In 2011, the Digital Services Committee members began exploring alternatives to DigiTool, their shared FLVC hosted DLS. After completing a review of functional requirements and existing systems, the universities and FLVC began the implementation process of their chosen platforms. Migrations began in 2013 with limited sets of materials. As functionalities were enhanced to support additional categories of materials from the legacy system, migration paths were created for the remaining materials.

Some of the challenges experienced with the institutional and statewide collaborative legacy collections were due to gradual changes in standards, technology, policies, and personnel. This was manifested in the quality of original digital files and metadata, as well as collection and record structures. 

Additionally, the complexities involved with multiple institutions collaborating and compromising throughout the migration process, as well as the move from a consortial support structure with a vendor solution to open source systems (both locally and consortially supported), presented their own sets of unique challenges. 

Following the presentation, the speakers will discuss commonalities in their migration experience, including learning opportunities for future migrations.

Presenters: Jamie Rogers (Florida International University), Lee Dotson (University of Central Florida), Lydia Motyka (Florida Virtual Campus (FLVC), Joanne Parandjuk (Florida Atlantic University)

Co-author: Melissa VandeBurgt (Florida Gulf Coast University)

Presentation 2
Efficient, Scalable Integration of EML Metadata within a DSpace Repository
Institutional repositories (IR) provide an archival function which is complementary to the typically more dynamic architectures of discipline specific data portals. In practice, the capabilities and archival workflows within IRs tend toward a flattening of domain specific ontologies into more general purpose data and metadata models, but as libraries endeavor to scale up research data management and preservation services the need to "walk the walk" - to demonstrate a dynamic and robust re-use of data and metadata across disciplines - becomes a central requirement of outreach, instruction, and curation activities. Considered together with the potential for increased IR use as a low barrier means of fulfilling open and public access requirements, it is equally important that processes for IR enhancement consist of minimal customization and novel implementations of existing repository features.

As a case study and to support the preservation of data previously published by the Sevilleta Long Term Ecological Research station, the University of New Mexico Libraries have developed a process for capturing the value additions provided by the host system, the LTER Network Data Portal (https://portal.lternet.edu/) and batch harvesting the data for ingest into LoboVault (http://repository.unm.edu/), a DSpace instance and the designated institutional repository of the University of New Mexico. To enrich the archival record, the Ecological Metadata Language (EML) metadata served through the LTER network is mined to reproduce such value added portal features as item level maps, provenance metadata snippets, and pre-formatted citations. Requiring only minimal customizations to the default DSpace configuration, the new workflow capitalizes on the system's batch ingest and templating capabilities to promote enhanced discovery, indexing, and potential re-use via a fuller representation of the source EML.

Presenter: Jon Wheeler (University of New Mexico)

Speakers
avatar for Lee Dotson

Lee Dotson

Digital Initiatives Librarian, University of Central Florida
Lee Dotson is the Digital Initiatives Librarian at the University of Central Florida Libraries. She has been the manager of STARS, UCF’s digital institutional repository, since it went live in the summer of 2015 and has had the opportunity to work with digital projects and repositories at UCF since the Libraries began digitization efforts in 1999. Her involvement has covered all aspects of digital collection building from scanning and OCR to... Read More →
LM

Lydia Motyka

Manager, Digital Services, Florida Virtual Campus (FLVC)
I am the manager of Digital Services at the Florida Virtual Campus. We host the digital library platform Islandora for the Florida state colleges and universities, and also run the Florida Digital Archive, host an instance of OJS, and provide other services to digital collections librarians.
avatar for Joanne Parandjuk

Joanne Parandjuk

Digital Library Manager, Florida Atlantic University
JR

Jamie Rogers

Assistant Director of Digital Collections, Florida International University
JW

Jonathan Wheeler

Data Curation Librarian, University of New Mexico


Tuesday October 27, 2015 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Salon A Pinnacle Hotel

4:00pm

Getting to Plan B: An Update on the Open Access Network • Supporting Monograph Production with a New Open Source Tool • Layering Copyright, Rights and Access Metadata in the UC San Diego DAMS: A Simplified Approach for Complex Scenarios
Presentation 1
Getting to Plan B: An Update on the Open Access Network
In the spring of 2015, Rebecca Kennison and Lisa Norberg launched the Open Access Network (OAN), a transformative solution for sustainable OA publishing and archiving in the humanities and social sciences. They spent the first six months talking to scholars, librarians, publishers, and academic administrators, then used their feedback to make extensive changes to the plan. Fundamental elements of the original model remain core to the OAN, including partnerships among key stakeholders and broad support across all tertiary institutions. This presentation will introduce the new model, offer insights on getting to Plan B and provide an update on implementation.

Presenter: Lisa Norberg (K|N Consultants)

Presentation 2
Supporting Monograph Production with a New Open Source Tool
University of California Press and California Digital Library (CDL) were recently awarded a grant by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to fund development of an open source, end-to-end workflow and authoring tool aimed at streamlining activities related to the production of scholarly monographs. This session will provide a more detailed overview of the current project, as well as an update on progress made toward its initial release. There will also be an opportunity for attendees to contribute ideas and feedback that will help shape continued development of the platform.

Presenters: Justin Gonder (California Digital Library), Catherine Mitchell (California Digital Library)

Presentation 3
Layering Copyright, Rights and Access Metadata in the UC San Diego DAMS: A Simplified Approach for Complex Scenarios
This presentation will outline the revised copyright, rights and access data model under development for digital objects managed within the UC San Diego Library's Digital Asset Management System (DAMS). Although this is being developed in the context of a Hydra system, the overall approach to layering and association of default behaviors with copyright, rights and access metadata URI's has broad applicability to digital library and data curation environments. This revised approach greatly simplifies the processes of assigning, managing and utilizing rights metadata, while continuing to support complex rights and access control scenarios for collections in the DAMS system.

Presenters: Arwen Hutt (University of California, San Diego), Matt Critchlow (University of California, San Diego), Ryan Johnson (University of California, San Diego)
Co-Author: Esme Cowles (University of California, San Diego)

Speakers
MC

Matt Critchlow

Manager of Development and Web Services, UC San Diego Library
avatar for Justin Gonder

Justin Gonder

Product Manager, Access & Publishing Group, California Digital Library
AH

Arwen Hutt

Metadata Librarian, UC San Diego
RJ

Ryan Johnson

Metadata Librarian, UC San Diego, Geisel Library
avatar for Catherine Mitchell

Catherine Mitchell

Director, Access & Publishing Group, California Digital Library, University of California
avatar for Lisa Norberg

Lisa Norberg

Principal, K|N Consultants
Open Access Network


Tuesday October 27, 2015 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Ballroom II & III

4:00pm

6 Snapshots - Process II
Library Publishing Services and Their Readers: Trends and Barriers in the Digital Collections We Create
Library publishing is a booming area of creation for tomorrow's digital collections. However, it has been unclear the extent to which library publishing services build from library strengths in studying users (i.e. readers) of information resources to shape publication formats and interface design. This presentation reports on a survey of library publishers to establish the extent to which they collect and use information about reader needs, preferences, and behaviors to inform publication design, and barriers to doing so. I emphasize the importance of user studies for library publishing services as much as traditional collections and public service functions.

Presenter: Daniel Tracy (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

$165,000 Later: Scholarly Publishing Reform in Motion
The Office of Research the University Libraries jointly established the Open Publishing Support Fund in October 2008 to enable authors to retain copyright in their works, accelerate digital dissemination of the university's research, and raise awareness of open access publishing on campus. Simply put, the fund reimburses authors for article processing charges (APCs) levied by publishers of open access journals. This snapshot with take a closer look at the OA fund as it enters its eighth year, giving an analysis of applicants, awards, and publications, and an assessment of the fund's future.

Presenter: Holly Mercer (University of Tennessee)

Formalizing A Digital Library Program
Libraries and Information Technologies Services (LITS), a relatively new organization at Emory University, is in the process of reinvisioning work in four key digital library services: Digitization, Metadata, Building and Sustaining Digital Collections, and Discovery. We review the issues, challenges and opportunities in each of these areas, with particular emphasis on managing change as we progress towards building a new, formal Digital Library Program.

Presenters: Lars Meyer (Emory University), Emily Porter (Emory University)

Envisioning An Analog Repository
Join us to develop a working model of a multinational Analog Repository that will allow libraries to rethink the use of their physical and digital space. This working session will start with a 10 to 15 minute presentation of a proposed model that will allow libraries to divest themselves of their physical collection yet ensure the continued existence of the physical objects. Participants will then be encouraged to work together in small groups to constructively question the decisions, provide alternatives and help build a more robust working model. This model will then be used in a future cost benefit analysis.

Presenter: Hannah Rasmussen (Indiana University Bloomington)

It's Hard to Say Goodbye: Lessons Learned from a Whole Lotta Sunsetting
Scholars Portal has hosted RefWorks for over seventy institutions since 2004. After a failed RFP in late 2013, the decision was made to end all central citation management support, a process which wrapped up in September 2015. This snapshot session will look at some of the highlights and lowlights from this mass migration. We'll look at the many ways schools chose to communicate the transition, where it was successful, and where we flopped. Two months post-shut-down, we'll also look at how much heat we're still getting, and what we might do differently for our next software sunsetting adventure.

Presenter: Jacqueline Whyte Appleby (Scholars Portal, Ontario Council of University Libraries)

Using GitHub to Enhance Government Data Access
Increasingly researchers across the board are seeking out data to tackle the most complex and interesting questions in their disciplines and society. There is no place where this is better exhibited than in the social sciences. Libraries are constantly receiving requests from researchers seeking access to often free data. The increased access to data science tools and techniques have enabled Libraries to meet the growing need for data by users. tools like RStudio, GitHub, and Torrent we are able to create new data sets and offer that access to a wider audience without added expense to library budgets.

Presenter: Jonathan Cain (University of Oregon)

Speakers
avatar for Jacqueline Whyte Appleby

Jacqueline Whyte Appleby

Acting Assistant Director, Scholars Portal, Ontario Council of University Libraries
JC

Jonathan Cain

Librarian for Data Initiatives & PPPM, University of Oregon Libraries
LM

Lars Meyer

Director, Content Division, Emory University
EP

Emily Porter

Digital Library Program Coordinator, Emory University
Emory University
HR

Hannah Rasmussen

Researcher, Indiana University
avatar for Daniel Tracy

Daniel Tracy

Visiting LIS and Research Services Librarian, University Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Tuesday October 27, 2015 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Ballroom I

5:30pm

Digital Humanities and Libraries Meetup

Come join us for a social meetup aimed at those interested in intersections between digital humanities and libraries. The happy hour is hosted by dh+lib, the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations’ Libraries and Digital Humanities Special Interest Group, and the Association of College and Research Libraries’ Digital Humanities Interest Group (with local hosts Zoe Borovsky, Thomas Padilla, Sarah Potvin, Glen Worthey).

Questions? Find us on Twitter: @DHandLib@LibsDH, @zoepster@thomasgpadilla@sp_meta@gworthey


Moderators
avatar for Zoe Borovsky

Zoe Borovsky

Librarian for Digital Research and Scholarship, UCLA
University of California - Los Angeles
avatar for Thomas Padilla

Thomas Padilla

Digital Scholarship Librarian, Michigan State University
Thomas Padilla is Digital Scholarship Librarian at Michigan State University Libraries. In this role Thomas develops and promotes data collections to Humanists, teaches on Digital Humanities methods and tools, and engages scholars across disciplines on data curation and research data management needs. Prior to his move to Michigan he was at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign working at the Scholarly Commons and the Preservation Unit... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Potvin

Sarah Potvin

Digital Scholarship Librarian, Texas A&M University Libraries
Sarah Potvin is the Digital Scholarship Librarian in the Office of Scholarly Communication in the Texas A&M University Libraries. A co-founder of the dh+lib project and co-convener of the new ADHO digital humanities and libraries SIG, she is interested in the ways that libraries and librarians encounter and advance digital humanities. This year, she is particularly interested in talking about digital asset management systems, geospatial... Read More →
avatar for Glen Worthey

Glen Worthey

Digital Humanities Librarian, Stanford University Libraries
I've been Digital Humanities Librarian in the Stanford University Libraries since 1997, and co-lead the Libraries' new Center for Interdisciplinary Digital Research (CIDR). I hosted the international "Digital Humanities 2011" conference at Stanford, and am currently a member of the Executive Board of the Association for Computers and the Humanities (ACH) and the Steering Committee for the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations (ADHO). My... Read More →

Tuesday October 27, 2015 5:30pm - 7:30pm
Steamworks 375 Water Street

6:30pm

Dine Arounds
Dine arounds offer a chance to try a restaurant in Vancouver and spend time with other attendees. Staff from our local host, University of British Columbia, handpicked eight restaurants within walking distance of the conference hotel. Compare restaurants at a glance and sign up here:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1agQI-O2xl0KvdnVC9NmT6lZgDJSl2FmQxNL92CDMELA/edit?usp=sharing

Please indicate whether you will walk with your group from the hotel, or meet at the restaurant.

Tuesday October 27, 2015 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Vancouver City
 
Wednesday, October 28
 

7:00am

Breakfast
Wednesday October 28, 2015 7:00am - 8:45am
Foyer & Ballroom (2nd Level)

8:00am

Registration & Info Desk
Wednesday October 28, 2015 8:00am - 2:30pm
Foyer (2nd Level) Pinnacle Hotel

9:00am

How to Dodge the Born Digital News Memory Hole • Linking Born-Digital News and Social Media Collections via Automated Entity Detection and Authority Matching • Online-Only Media: 21st Century Collection Crisis?
Presentation 1
How to Dodge the Born Digital News Memory Hole
The year is 2104. For her Europa University sociology studies your great granddaughter must research the distribution of news through early 21st century social media like Facebook and Twitter, predecessors to MyUniverse, the largest communications and social network on Earth, Mars, and most of Jupiter's moons, including Europa. Unfortunately, even though her University is a founding member of MyUniverse with full privileges, she cannot find much news about social media from the early 2000s. She asks you to help. You must tell her why news from this time is scarce.

Sound farfetched? Unfortunately it isn't. The present state of copyright laws, the lack of born digital legal deposit legislation in this country and many others, and rapid technology changes in the production and distribution of news combined with neglect of born digital news by cultural heritage organizations make your great granddaughter's research misfortune altogether too likely.

In a keynote at the Dodging the Memory Hole conference Clifford Lynch reminded us that news is important not only now but also in future as "the first draft of history". An accurate and easily accessible journalistic record is important to many people and organizations: Historians, politicians, genealogists, scholars of all sorts, academics, sociologists, economists, governments, and, of course, to your great granddaughter.

The preservation challenges are formidable. It's no longer as simple as subscribing to the Washington Post and binding issues into volumes. Or piling them in a safe, neglected corner. Now to preserve news we must consider copyright, the dizzying variety of formats for digital news, the composite nature of many news feeds, its algorithmic personalization by Facebook, Google, and others, changes due to changing governments, citizen journalists and bloggers, as well comments about the news by readers. Once news was scarce. Now we are drowning in it! What can you do?

Presenters: Frederick Zarndt (Digital Divide Data), Sam Meister (Educopia Institute), Edward McCain (Donald W. Reynolds Institute, Missouri School of Journalism)

Presentation 2
Linking Born-Digital News and Social Media Collections via Automated Entity Detection and Authority Matching
Digital libraries increasingly have the means to assemble large collections of born-digital news materials and social media records. These collections can be opaque and difficult to use on their own, yet become much more valuable when linked to each other, thereby increasing their collective exposure and discoverability and ultimately enabling the assembly of multi-perspective histories of significant events. We have been developing techniques to discover and use such inter-archive connections and now wish to share with the DLF community the results of our latest project, which links social media materials to a large database of computationally indexed news broadcasts.

The tools and resources we have employed in this project include named-entity extraction software specially tuned for each type of media, which then reconciles discovered entities with entries in the Virtual International Authority File (VIAF) service. To demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique and present a practical example for comment and evaluation, we describe our experiences linking particular sections of the UCLA NewsScape television news collection to material captured from Twitter that pertains to specific events of regional or global interest.

Steps we have taken to evaluate the effectiveness of these efforts include enumerating the types of entities we were able to discover and link between the two collections, as a first-order quantification of how our linking techniques can increase the visibility and discoverability of the resources in each collection. We also have assembled case studies of the types of multi-perspective narratives that users can build using online search aids that incorporate discovered inter-collection links into their results. We welcome input from other forum participants regarding next steps to take, new tools and resources to use in the future, and the potential for subsequent collaborations and re-use of our work in other archival projects.

Presenters: Martin Klein (University of California, Los Angeles), Peter Broadwell (University of California, Los Angeles)

Presentation 3
Online-Only Media: 21st Century Collection Crisis?
Today's music and movie industry is increasingly favoring streaming and download-only, direct-to-consumer distribution. No longer can librarians or archivists expect to collect sound recordings and videos on tangible media (e.g., CDs and DVDs) where first sale doctrine applies. At an ever-increasing rate, librarians are discovering that many titles are only available via such online distribution sites as iTunes or Amazon.com. These distributors require individual purchasers to agree to restrictive end-user license agreements (EULAs) that explicitly forbid institutional access and such core library functions as lending: "Upon payment for Music Content, we grant you a non-exclusive, non-transferable right to use the Music Content only for your personal, non-commercial, entertainment use..." (amazon.com).

With this presentation we describe failed attempts to negotiate a library-friendly EULA with tech/music industry representatives, and give an overview of an IMLS funded project tasked with investigating the issue. Called the "National Forum on Online-Only Music," the project has enabled us to hire legal consultants, work with the Library of Congress' National Recording Preservation Board, as well as envision a range of possible solutions: from licensing online-only works directly from artists to creating a closed collection of files that would be released when the content is no longer commercially available.

Presenter: John Vallier (University of Washington Libraries)

Speakers
avatar for Peter Broadwell

Peter Broadwell

Academic Projects Developer, UCLA Digital Library
Peter coordinates experimental archiving projects with faculty members at UCLA and his colleagues in the Digital Library Program. He manages the preservation of the UCLA NewsScape collection of digitized television news and is presently researching new methods for automatically linking social media collections to digitized television news archives.
MK

Martin Klein

Scientist, University of California Los Angeles
I have been involved in web archiving projects for more than 10 years. Most recently, I have focused on the collecting, archiving, and analyzing of social media and comparing it to more traditional TV news broadcast content captured at UCLA.
avatar for Edward McCain

Edward McCain

Digital Curator of Journalism, Reynolds Journalism Institute
As founder of the Journalism Digital News Archive agenda, Edward McCain's prime directive is saving the "first rough draft" of history created on a computer or digital sensor. He also leads JDNA's "Dodging the Memory Hole" outreach initiative. McCain holds a Bachelor of Journalism degree from the University of Missouri, Columbia and a Masters degree in Information Science and graduate certificate in Digital Information Management from the... Read More →
avatar for John Vallier

John Vallier

head, Distributed Media Services, University of Washington Libraries
avatar for Frederick Zarndt

Frederick Zarndt

Consultant, Digital Divide Data
Digital Divide Data


Wednesday October 28, 2015 9:00am - 10:30am
Salon A Pinnacle Hotel

9:00am

Statistical DPLA: Metadata Counting and Word Analysis • Think Globally, Act Locally: How Working with DPLA has Improved Our Collections
Presentation 1
Statistical DPLA: Metadata Counting and Word Analysis
Building on work recently presented at DPLAFest, this presentation will highlight next steps in research into metadata quantification and metadata quality. The presentation will begin with a review of phase one of the project, which focused on element counts, top level word counts across fields and across collections, and techniques for visualizing these data. The focus of phase two is applying Natural Language Processing (NLP) techniques to understand word frequencies, common words, and rare / unique words across the DPLA text corpus.

Questions posed include:

• Are there naturally occurring clusters of words that differentiate DPLA providers?
• Are there differences in language patterns between providers or between hub types (content vs. service)?
• Are there gaps or differences, or is there alignment, in the language used in search terms versus collection metadata?
• Are there relationships between language in search terms, metadata terms, and item usage as measured by Google Analytics?
• Are there patterns to the language used in Twitter references to DPLA items?

The presentation will provide preliminary responses to these research questions and discuss the development of Metadata NLP and term / N-gram frequency visualization techniques. This will be followed by a participatory discussion of metadata language research; its relationship to metadata best practice, quality, and completeness; and possible next steps to expand exploration of these techniques beyond DPLA.

Presenter: Corey Harper (New York University)

Think Globally, Act Locally: How Working with DPLA has Improved Our Collections
This panel discussion brings together various people involved with resource aggregation for the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA). Each person will discuss how working as an aggregator for the DPLA has changed how they approach, work with and describe their own local collections. This can involve metadata processes, collection organization, tools used, local discovery practices, or other workflows related to digital collections. To keep the style of the panel informal and open to audience participation, each panelist will have only a short (~5 minutes) time to present an overview of their position at the start of the event. Then the group will be guided through a series of questions and discussion points, some agreed upon in advance, some taken from the audience, which will further elucidate how working with the DPLA has positively impacted their own work.

Presenters: Emily Gore (Digital Public Library of America), Marcia McIntosh (University of North Texas), Linda Ballinger (Penn State University), Chris Stanton (Metropolitan New York Library Council / Empire State Digital Network), Christina Harlow (University of Tennessee, Knoxville)

Speakers
LB

Linda Ballinger

Metadata Strategist, Penn State University Libraries
avatar for Emily Gore

Emily Gore

Director for Content, DPLA
avatar for Christina Harlow

Christina Harlow

metadataist
CH

Corey Harper

Metadata Services Librarian, New York University
MM

Marcia McIntosh

Digital Production Librarian, University of North Texas
University of North Texas
avatar for Chris Stanton

Chris Stanton

Metadata Specialist, Metropolitan New York Library Council


Wednesday October 28, 2015 9:00am - 10:30am
Ballroom I

9:00am

8 Snapshots - Archives/Digital Collections
Connecting Presidential Collections
Connecting Presidential Collections was presented as a poster presentation at the 2012 DLF Forum. Come learn about how the project has progressed in the last three years:

• From an IMLS planning grant to an IMLS project grant;
• From 1-year grant cycle to 3-year grant cycle;
• From 6 partners to 12 partners;
• From 11,000 digital items to almost 240,000 digital items.

We will discuss the four parts of the grant project and demo some of the project resources. We will also talk about the major challenges that we have faced—some quite unexpected—and how we have addressed them.

Presenters: Sheila Blackford (University of Virginia), Amber Reichert (University of Virginia)

From Digital Collection to Encyclopedia: the Arhoolie Foundation's Frontera Collection
This presentation uses the Arhoolie Foundation's Strachwitz Frontera Collection of Mexican and Mexican American Recordings digitization project to examine and question the extent to which digital library standards and practices have enhanced or challenged the aims of the project. The presentation discusses the decisions at various points during the project to conform to standards, or not, as we sought to meets the sometimes conflicting user and institutional needs and objectives.

Presenters: Kristian Allen (University of California, Los Angeles), Stephen Davison (California Institute of Technology), Elizabeth McAulay (University of California, Los Angeles)

Creating a Single Search across Multiple City of Burnaby Cultural Resources
The Heritage Burnaby website represents all of the community heritage assets managed by the City of Burnaby, British Columbia: archives records, City Council records, special collections library records, artifacts, and heritage buildings. A major upgrade completed in 2015 provides users with a single search across all data and resources. Results from disparate collections are interfiled and include library, archival and museum metadata, digitized books, streaming audio oral history recordings, videos as well council minutes, reports and bylaws. This snapshot will demonstrate how libraries, archives, museums and other civic departments can partner to present a unified heritage portal for citizens.

Presenters: Jonathan Jacobsen (Andornot Consulting), Lisa Codd (Burnaby Village Museum, City of Burnaby)

ArcLight: Enhancing Discovery and Access for Archival Materials
ArcLight is intended to be an open source web-based solution that will give institutions an enhanced way to provide access to their archival collections by integrating digital objects with archival description. Our presentation has two main goals: 1) Clearly convey the vision and objectives of ArcLight so attendees can assess whether it may be relevant to their institution, and 2) Update the community on the current status of the design process so that those interested in ArcLight know how they can contribute to the design and/or development process to make ArcLight an effective solution for their archival discovery needs.

Presenters: Laura Wilsey (Stanford University), Gary Geisler (Stanford University), Jennifer Vine (Stanford University)

A Truth Universally Acknowledged: The Lizzie Bennet Diaries and Long-term Preservation Considerations for Born-digital Transmedia Storytelling
Transmedia storytelling is a narrative method which utilizes multiple platforms and/or formats to tell parts of a cohesive story. Innovative web-based projects use text, images, video, and social media platforms to maximize interactivity between creators, audiences, and in-world characters. These interactions are timely, immediate, and ephemeral. The creative output resides on various web-based platforms. For digital archivists and librarians, they present unique challenges, on both technical and policy levels. Using the award-winning web series, "The Lizzie Bennet Diaries" as an example, this Snapshot session poses questions about the long-term preservation needs of transmedia storytelling projects and born-digital creative content.

Presenter: Emily Zheng (University of Alberta)


Collaboration, "Crowdsourcing," and Data Curation for Book History
"Crowdsourcing" is a popular term, but often vaguely used to encompass a more nuanced range of activities involving contributions from an array of individual users and collaboration on methods and standards across multiple individual institutions. This snapshot talk addresses approaches to data curation and collaboration for the Provenance Online Project (POP), currently hosted on Flickr and now working with a group of 5 partner institutions to post images of and metadata for ownership marks online that a user community helps to describe and identify, leading to information about the history of the world's books.

Presenter: Laura Aydelotte (University of Pennsylvania)

Olive Executable Archive: Next Steps
This talk discusses Olive Executable Archive (https://olivearchive.org/) accomplishments in preserving for use early web browsers; word processing, spreadsheet and presentation software; computer games; simulation packages; and educational software. Some software such as educational visualization software and computer games is self-contained; they can be executed within Olive. Other archived software begins its useful life when opening external files thought to be lost. Moving forward Olive proposes where the community might seek common cause in addressing executable content, looks to the community for engagement and thoughtful critique and invites attendee feedback.

Presenter: Erika Linke (Carnegie Mellon University)

YouTube for Mathematics (almost, but digitally preserved) - BIRS and UBC Collaborate to Create a Digitally Preserved Mathematical Video Archive
Math scholars anywhere in the world can now access thousands of workshops and lectures of the renowned Banff International Research Station for Mathematical Innovation and Discovery (BIRS), thanks to University of British Columbia (UBC) Library's data management and digital preservation work, using Archivematica (for digital preservation) and DSpace (for access).

Presenter: Bronwen Sprout (University of British Columbia), Eugene Barsky (University of British Columbia)

Speakers
avatar for Laura  Aydelotte

Laura Aydelotte

CLIR Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Pennsylvania
avatar for Eugene Barsky

Eugene Barsky

Research Data Librarian, University of British Columbia Library
avatar for Sheila Blackford

Sheila Blackford

Librarian, Miller Center, University of Virginia
LC

Lisa Codd

Curator, Burnaby Village Museum
SD

Stephen Davison

Head of Digital Library Development, Caltech Library
GG

Gary Geisler

UX Designer, Stanford University DLSS
avatar for Jonathan Jacobsen

Jonathan Jacobsen

Consultant, Andornot Consulting
Andornot is a well-respected information management consulting firm incorporated in 1995 and based in Vancouver, Canada. We help a wide range of corporations, law firms, public institutions, government organizations, non-profits, archives, museums and small businesses utilize the latest information management solutions.
avatar for Erika Linke

Erika Linke

Associate Dean & Director of Research/Academic Services, Carnegie Mellon University
avatar for Elizabeth McAulay

Elizabeth McAulay

Head, Digital Library Program, UCLA
McAulay has worked in the UCLA Digital Library Program for several years as the Librarian for Digital Collection Development and now serving as Interim Head. The UCLA Digital Library Program pursues and publishes digital projects that have international impact.
avatar for Ambert Lautigar Reichert

Ambert Lautigar Reichert

Web Developer, Miller Center, University of Virginia
BS

Bronwen Sprout

Head, Digital Programs and Services, UBC Library
JV

Jennifer Vine

User Experience Designer, Stanford University Libraries
avatar for Laura Wilsey

Laura Wilsey

Digital Library Data Administrator, Stanford University Libraries
avatar for Emily Zheng

Emily Zheng

Public Services Librarian, University of Alberta
Emily Zheng is also a Public Service Librarian at the University of Alberta. She serves as liaison to English Literature and Political Science, with public service responsibilities in Law.


Wednesday October 28, 2015 9:00am - 10:30am
Ballroom II & III

9:00am

A hands-on introduction to GeoBlacklight
GeoBlacklight is a discovery solution for geospatial data that builds on the successful Blacklight platform. Many repositories have collections of GIS data and maps that aren't easily discoverable. GeoBlacklight solves these problems by providing a geospatial focused discovery experience. This will be a hands-on workshop, showcasing the features of GeoBlacklight and working through installing and running the software. Attendees will leave having both installed their very own GeoBlacklight installation, as well as structured and indexed sets of metadata.

Speakers
EF

Erin Fahy

Sr DevOps Engineer, Stanford Univ
avatar for James Griffin III

James Griffin III

Digital Library Developer, Lafayette College Libraries
EJ

Eliot Jordan

GIS Developer, Princeton Univesity
avatar for Jack Reed

Jack Reed

Geospatial Web Engineer, Stanford University


Wednesday October 28, 2015 9:00am - 10:30am
Salon F Pinnacle Hotel

10:30am

Break
Hot and cold beverages can be found outside the session rooms on the Lower Level and Levels 2 & 3.

Wednesday October 28, 2015 10:30am - 10:45am
2nd Level and Lower Level

10:45am

Capacity and Community: Setting Agendas for #ourDLF
This interactive DLF Forum closing event will bring together a diverse cross-section of DLF interests, communities, and perspectives, for an animated work session to set collaborative agendas. Bethany Nowviskie will moderate, and Chuck Henry will offer closing remarks. 

Add your ideas! We'll draw from Twitter, the DLF Community Idea-Hopper, and the live Forum crowd.

DLF Community Idea-Hopper: https://goo.gl/BSe6cV
Continue the conversation on Twitter at #ourDLF!

Moderators
CH

Charles Henry

President, Council on Library and InformationResources
avatar for Bethany Nowviskie

Bethany Nowviskie

Director, Digital Research & Scholarship, University of Virginia Library
Tell me what you most want and need from #ourDLF.

Speakers
avatar for Oliver Bendorf

Oliver Bendorf

DLF Program Associate, CLIR+DLF
Oliver Bendorf is the Program Associate at the Digital Library Federation, where he edits the website, writes and draws things, and has a keen interest in supporting outreach to diverse practitioner communities including iSchools and LGBT. He holds an MFA in Poetry and an MLIS, both from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and he has presented and taught internationally on topics including visual composition (cartooning, color, infographics, and... Read More →
avatar for amy buckland

amy buckland

Vice-chair, ACRL's Research & Scholarly Environment Committee
librarianator doing digital scholarship stuffs at UChicago. Montréalaise. #OA4life. she/her/hers. CHALLENGE LEGACY PROCESSES.
avatar for Jody L DeRidder

Jody L DeRidder

Head, Metadata & Digital Services, University of Alabama
My focus is on leveraging available resources, energy and interests to develop collaborative and often innovative solutions to problems we all face. My background is heavily technical, but my approach is very humanistic. I'm actively seeking opportunities in which I can best contribute to the field and meeting needs/improving services.
avatar for Nikki Ferraiolo

Nikki Ferraiolo

Program Officer for Scholarly Resources, Council on Library and Information Resources
avatar for Cristela Garcia-Spitz

Cristela Garcia-Spitz

Digital Library Development Project Manager, ClimateQUAL Implementation Team Co-Chair, UC San Diego Library
UCSD
avatar for Hannah Scates Kettler

Hannah Scates Kettler

Digital Humanities Librarian, University of Iowa Libraries
Currently involved in public digital scholarship and pedagogy, social media, 3D digital representation and visualization, games and gaming, access and dissemination of higher education and research and big data archaeology.
avatar for Max Marmor

Max Marmor

President, Samuel H Kress Foundation
I'm a former art librarian (UCLA, Columbia, NYU/IFA, Yale) and left librarianship in 2001 to be part of the Mellon Foundation's planning team for ARTstor. In 2007 I moved to the Kress Foundation.
avatar for Mark Matienzo

Mark Matienzo

Director of Technology, Digital Public Library of America
Mark A. Matienzo is the Director of Technology for DPLA. As Director of Technology, Mark is responsible for the overall technology vision for the DPLA and overseeing its implementation. Mark also serves as the primary technical contact for outside organizations, partners, and developers. Prior to joining DPLA, Mark worked as an archivist and technologist specializing in born-digital materials and metadata management, at institutions including the... Read More →
avatar for Kelcy Shepherd

Kelcy Shepherd

DPLA Network Manager, Digital Public Library of America
The Digital Public Library of America
avatar for Plato Smith

Plato Smith

CLIR/DLF Postdoctoral Fellow, University of New Mexico



Wednesday October 28, 2015 10:45am - 12:00pm
Ballroom Pinnacle Hotel

1:00pm

DPLA Data Day
You need this ticket from Eventbrite to sign up: DPLA Data Day: Building a Stronger Cultural Heritage Network.
Building a Stronger Cultural Heritage Network
Join us for a half-day workshop learning about DPLA data and how you can use it to inform your practice and make extreme sharing part of your workflow!

The workshop will be comprised of 3 sessions, with ample time to network in-between.

Collections Data as Research Data: What we know in aggregate
Defining the problem of metadata quality and the opportunities around investing in better data quality, demonstrated by research done by community members.

Discussion aspect to touch on research agenda for/by DPLA, and the opportunity of using DPLA data for research.

Data analysis performed on metadata available through the DPLA API will be topic of discussion. Data analyzed will include rights statements, subjects, etc.

DPLA Rights work: how better rights statements mean better (re)use.
An overview of the work of the international committee on the development of standardized rights statements for use in our community will be provided. We will discuss the proposed statements and the technical implementation of the statements, to be housed at rightsstatements.org. A project timeline and demonstration of how the statements will function in the DPLA network and beyond will be provided.

Break out work: Workshop participants will be encouraged to provide feedback on the implementation of rights statements and to identify potential adopters/implementers. Workshop participants will also be encouraged to discuss needed education/tools for implementation.

DPLA Metadata Enrichment work: Better together
We will have a discussion around processes of metadata enrichment, with a specific focus on enrichment processes undertaken by DPLA and its Hubs. This will include a brief review of the DPLA metadata and mapping enrichment processes, and may include brief presentations from others within the DPLA network. We will also have an open discussion of known gaps and current needs, such as the inability to round trip enrichment back to Hubs and partners.

Break out work: Participants will break into groups to discuss existing tools and needs; groups will be encouraged to develop concrete enrichment use cases to inform future work on tools, including the aggregation and enrichment portions of the Hydra in a Box project.

Speakers
avatar for Greg Cram

Greg Cram

Associate Director, Copyright and Information Policy, The New York Public Library
The New York Public Library
avatar for Emily Gore

Emily Gore

Director for Content, DPLA
avatar for Christina Harlow

Christina Harlow

metadataist
CH

Corey Harper

Metadata Services Librarian, New York University
avatar for Unmil Karadkar

Unmil Karadkar

Assistant Professor, The University of Texas at Austin
avatar for Mark Matienzo

Mark Matienzo

Director of Technology, Digital Public Library of America
Mark A. Matienzo is the Director of Technology for DPLA. As Director of Technology, Mark is responsible for the overall technology vision for the DPLA and overseeing its implementation. Mark also serves as the primary technical contact for outside organizations, partners, and developers. Prior to joining DPLA, Mark worked as an archivist and technologist specializing in born-digital materials and metadata management, at institutions including the... Read More →
avatar for Chris Stanton

Chris Stanton

Metadata Specialist, Metropolitan New York Library Council


Wednesday October 28, 2015 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Salon F Pinnacle Hotel

1:00pm

Digital Curation Using Archivematica and AtoM
Limited Capacity filling up

Archivematica is an OAIS-based suite of open-source tools used to perform ingest and preservation actions on born-digital and digitized holdings. AtoM, or Access to Memory, is an open-source application used to display digital objects and descriptive metadata online. The two applications can be used as stand-alone tools or as an integrated end-to-end system to preserve and provide access to institutional holdings. Lead by AtoM Product Manager Dan Gillean and Systems Archivist Sarah Romkey from Artefactual Systems, this hands-on workshop will cover using the web-based Archivematica dashboard to ingest sample content, take digital preservation actions on that content, and display and describe the content in AtoM. Use cases will include both born-digital and digitized materials in multiple file formats. We will also cover the basics of the Open Archival Information System (OAIS) and discuss how open standards such as METS, PREMIS, Dublin Core, ISAD(G) and EAD are used by the open-source software community. This workshop is restricted to a maximum of 40 participants. Participants are requested to bring laptops with them.

Speakers
avatar for Dan Gillean

Dan Gillean

AtoM Program Manager, Artefactual Systems
Dan Gillean serves as the AtoM Progam Manager with Artefactual Systems and provides quality assurance testing, requirements analysis, documentation, technical support, and community dialogue for Artefactual's AtoM and Archivematica projects.
avatar for Sarah Romkey

Sarah Romkey

Systems Archivist, Artefactual Systems Inc.
Systems Archivist for Archivematica, AtoM and ArchivesDirect.


Wednesday October 28, 2015 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Salon D

1:00pm

Dive-Into-Hydra
Limited Capacity seats available

This half day workshop walks technically oriented staff through the core concepts underlying any hydra repository:

• Fedora / Solr / Blacklight / Rails integration
• Data-models in Hydra
• RDF and XML metadata support
• Storing & recalling digital content
• Searching using Blacklight

This workshop is targeted at developers new to, or considering adopting Hydra. Some prior programming experience (in any language), comfort running shell commands, and experience with a terminal based text editor such as vim, vi, nano, etc. are very helpful. Attendees without these skills are encouraged to pair with other attendees to collaboratively complete workshop exercises.

Attendees should bring their own laptop and power supply.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Bussey

Mark Bussey

Chief Information Leafblower, Data Curation Experts LLC
Data Curation Experts


Wednesday October 28, 2015 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Salon C

2:00pm

DLF eResearch Network
This meeting is for current participants in the DLF eResearch Network.

Wednesday October 28, 2015 2:00pm - 5:00pm
Salon E Pinnacle Hotel
 
Thursday, October 29
 

8:00am

Registration & Info Desk
Thursday October 29, 2015 8:00am - 1:00pm
Foyer (Lower Level) Pinnacle Hotel

9:00am

DPN Fall Membership Meeting
You need this ticket from Eventbrite to sign up: DPN Fall Membership Meeting.
Schedule:

8 - 9am - Breakfast

9am - Welcome & Comments for the day

9:15 - 9:45am - Update from Leadership Team

9:45 - 10am - Break

10am - 12pm - Breakouts

  • Technical - Architecture & Ingest Workflows

  • Year 1 Roadmapping


12 - 1pm - Lunch

1 - 3pm - Breakouts

  • Technical - Architecture & Ingest Workflows

  • Year 1 Roadmapping - Reporting, Discussion, & Next Steps


3 - 3:30 - Closing Remarks

3:30 - Adjourn

3:30 - 5pm - Committee Meetings

  • Membership

  • Heavy Users

  • Pricing

  • Technical Advisory

  • Services Advisory

  • Deposit Agreement WG

  • Preservation Standards WG


5pm - Report Out (Refreshments will be served)

Thursday October 29, 2015 9:00am - 5:00pm
Salon F Pinnacle Hotel

9:00am

LODLAM in Practice Workshop
You need this ticket from Eventbrite to sign up: LODLAM in Practice Workshop.
Linked Open Data in libraries, archives and museums (“LODLAM”) continues to be a fast growing area of policy and technology having a major impact on the way memory institutions are opening the doors to new kinds of research, discovery and access.

This day-long training workshop will equip you with the knowledge and tools to engage in your own LODLAM projects. Expert practitioners will demonstrate real-world examples, teach open source tools, and give hands-on instruction. Tutorials will cover a range of skill sets moving from novice to advanced as the day goes on. You’ll learn the basics of cleaning, publishing, and linking metadata as well as querying, consuming, and connecting datasets. We’ll also cover data collection visualizations and building more advanced queries. Throughout the day, there will be ample opportunity to make connections and dig deeper into the topics introduced here.

Schedule

9:00am–10:00am
Introductions and LODLAM overview - Ben Hyman (BC Libraries Cooperative)

10:15am–12:00pm
Cleaning and publishing metadata: hands on tutorial with OpenRefine - Christina Harlow (University of Tennessee)

12:00pm–1:30pm
Lunch/Networking

1:30pm–2:00pm
Dork shorts

Opportunity for workshop participants to give 2-3 minute lightning talks/demonstrations about their or their institution's LODLAM applications/efforts 

2:15pm–3:30pm
Querying and linking data with SPARQL - Tom Johnson (DPLA)

3:30–4:30pm
LODLAM clinic
Options may include: Small group work with instructors; Exploring existing projects; LOD policy and strategy at your institution

We strongly encourage participants to bring a laptop so they may participate in hands-on training.

As of 9/29/15, this workshop is sold out.

Speakers
avatar for Christina Harlow

Christina Harlow

metadataist
avatar for Ben Hyman

Ben Hyman

Executive Director, BC Libraries Cooperative
Executive Director at BC Libraries Cooperative. Technologist, policy strategist and advocate for the use of open tools, brings progressive approaches to the challenges facing the Co-op's diverse membership.
TJ

Tom Johnson

Metadata & Platform Architect, Digital Public Library of America


Thursday October 29, 2015 9:00am - 5:00pm
Salon E Pinnacle Hotel

10:00am

Islandora Digital Repository Workshop
You need this ticket from Eventbrite to sign up: Islandora Digital Repository Workshop.

Islandora is a digital repository framework that provides out-of-the-box repository solutions (Solution Packs) for a wide range of digital collections and research domains. Islandora combines the Drupal CMS and Fedora Commons repository software, together with additional open source applications (including Solr), to deliver a wide range of functionality. The workshop will give participants a chance to explore how community members are using Islandora, and how to:

  • Change the look and feel of a repository website;
  • Create users, roles and permissions to manage workflow;
  • Ingest and manage digital assets;
  • Harvest assets to aggregators such as DPLA;
  • Restrict access to digital assets; and  
  • Configure the discovery layer and metadata display tools.

Registration for this event is $80 USD and includes refreshments and lunch.


Speakers
avatar for Mark Leggott

Mark Leggott

President, discoverygarden Inc.
Mark is the University Librarian at the University of PEI, President of discoverygarden Inc. and founder of the open source Islandora project. Mark has been involved with things open and digital for most of his career, and together with the team at the University of PEI is working on a digital archive of the complete cultural and heritage history of the Island. As founder of the Islandora project Mark collaborates with global institutions... Read More →


Thursday October 29, 2015 10:00am - 4:00pm
Port of Singapore Pinnacle Hotel

10:00am

Taiga Forum
You need this ticket from Eventbrite to sign up: Taiga Forum.
Crossing the Table: Employee Relations Issues in Libraries

The Taiga Forum, held annually in conjunction with the DLF Forum, is a place to facilitate a robust community of practice for academic library leaders who cross traditional organizational boundaries to focus on creating the future within our organizations. The 2015 event will be a conversation about employee relations in libraries.

Employee relations in higher education can be a difficult maze of interrelated policies and issues that can involve multiple library and campus groups, as well as the relationships between these groups. Academic library leaders must envision and lead change in library services and staffing, negotiate complex issues with labor unions and other employee associations, effectively place the library staffing model within the campus research and teaching culture, and do all of this while strengthening employee morale and engagement and promoting a culture that values all levels of staff.

The Taiga Forum, following the DLF Forum in Vancouver, will feature expert speakers and open, honest discussion of challenges and strategies for these types of employee relations issues, including evolving staffing models, changes in promotion and tenure models for librarians, and working with unions and employee associations. The conversations will focus both on staff and on librarians, and on productive ways to work with each and to bridge the gap between them.

In addition, we will ask willing participants to share their own employee relations experiences and tips in lightning talk-style presentations. Come learn and share your own experiences with how these issues affect academic libraries, and what tools you can employ as a current or aspiring academic library leader to effectively navigate challenging employee relations matters.

Registration is $120 and is open to all.

Location
Learning Commons
University of British Columbia Vancouver Campus
Room 301
Irving K. Barber Learning Centre
1961 East Mall
Vancouver, BC Canada V6T 1Z1
Telephone 604-827-3909
Website learningcommons.ubc.ca 

Thursday October 29, 2015 10:00am - 4:00pm
Lillooet Room (301), Chapman Learning Commons, Irving K Barber Learning Centre University of British Columbia Vancouver Campus